India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi waves from a MIG 29 fighter aboard the country's largest warship, INS Vikramaditya, off the coast of Goa, India, on June 14. STR/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

toggle caption STR/Xinhua /Landov

Women shout slogans during a protest against the gang rape and hanging of two teenage girls. Beyond highlighting the rampant sexual violence in India, the crimes are drawing attention to a glaring and fundamental problem across the country that threatens women's safety: the lack of toilets. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

toggle caption Altaf Qadri/AP

How A Lack Of Toilets Puts India's Women At Risk Of Assault

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/319529037/320220113" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Narendra Modi, shown here at an April 5 campaign rally, was ostracized by the United States for more than a decade. As it became increasingly clear in recent months that he was likely to become India's next leader, the U.S. and European countries began reaching out to him. Sam Panthaky /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Sam Panthaky /AFP/Getty Images

India's next prime minister, Narendra Modi, receives a blessing from his mother at her home in the western state of Gujarat on Friday, as election results showed a resounding win for Modi's opposition party. Ajit Solanki/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ajit Solanki/AP

Landslide Win Puts Opposition Party In Charge In India

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/312990297/312993177" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">