A boat approaches Ghoramara island in India's Sundarbans. Most traffic goes the other way, as thousands of Ghoramara residents have left the flood-prone island in recent years. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The Vanishing Islands Of India's Sundarbans

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Ambadas Raut uses copper rods known as dowsing sticks to locate sources of underground water in a dry reservoir. He's had 400 clients and says he's found water for 80 percent of them. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Are Indians Turning To The 'Supernatural' In Subterranean Search For Water?

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Debnath Mondal (front right), who survived a tiger attack in 2010, patrols the banks of the Sundarbans tiger preserve with another forest guard and a boat skipper. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Debendra Tarek, 80, inspects a handful of salt-resistant rice in his home on the tidal island of Ghoramara, which is shrinking quickly because of climate change. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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On a new episode of The Mindy Project, Dr. Mindy Lahiri decided to embrace her Indian roots, taking her son for a Hindu head-shaving ceremony. Evans Vestal Ward/Universal Television hide caption

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Dr. Gita Prakash (left), who runs a family clinic from her home in New Delhi, examines 10-year-old Sonu Kumar Chaudhary as his father, restaurant deliveryman Dilip Kumar Chaudhary, looks on. Prakash sees more and more cases of illness caused by the city's polluted air. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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India's Big Battle: Development Vs. Pollution

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A special hearth (left) for "green" cremations uses less wood and takes less time than traditional cremations. The new cremation method cuts down on air pollution. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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In India, Eco-Friendly Cremation Is Easy — But It's A Tough Sell

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Protesters rally near the home of a girl who was raped in New Delhi on Oct. 17. The Indian government is trying to improve its emergency response system, particularly in cases of assault. Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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