People will still be able to buy health insurance if they have pre-existing conditions, but its not clear how healthy the health insurance market would be under the GOP bill. andresr/Getty Images hide caption

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How Will People Who Are Already Sick Be Treated Under A New Health Law?

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House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas (from left) and House Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden, R-Ore., answer questions about the American Health Care Act. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Women attend the EMILY's List Breaking Through 2016 event at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia in July. Paul Zimmerman/Getty Images hide caption

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Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani delivers a passionate speech on the first day of the Republican National Convention. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures during a rally at the San Jose Convention Center earlier this month. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Republican Ted Cruz (left) addresses the media after a campaign rally earlier this month in Kansas City, Mo.; Democrat Bernie Sanders speaks at a town hall event last week in Milwaukee. Polls ahead of Tuesday's Wisconsin primary contests gave Cruz and Sanders narrow leads. Kyle Rivas (L) and Darren Hauck (R)/Getty Images hide caption

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Retiring Rep. Scott Rigell, R-Va. — seen here awaiting election results on Nov. 2, 2010 — says he wants to continue work in his soon-to-be-private life to inject more civility in American politics. Ross Taylor/AP hide caption

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Ross Taylor/AP

House GOP's 2010 Tea Party Class Heads For The Exits

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Confetti falls on the head of John Kasich, governor of Ohio and a 2016 Republican presidential candidate, after speaking during a campaign event in Berea, Ohio, on Tuesday. Kasich secured his first victory on Mega Tuesday. Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images