Cabinet-card portrait of brain-injury survivor Phineas Gage (1823–1860), shown holding the tamping iron that injured him. Wikimedia hide caption

toggle caption
Wikimedia

Why Brain Scientists Are Still Obsessed With The Curious Case Of Phineas Gage

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/528966102/529364560" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fortified dwelling and open air banquet, detail from a mosaic portraying a Nilotic landscape from El Alia, Tunisia. Roman Civilisation, 2nd century. Musée National Du Bardo (Archaeological Museum) DeAgostini/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
DeAgostini/Getty Images

Claire Stewart, author of As Long as We Both Shall Eat: A History of Wedding Food and Feasts, says the white-frosted cake familiar today "is a fairly modern invention." Michael Skoglund/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Skoglund/Getty Images

An Army horse wears a gas mask to guard against German gas attacks. Courtesy of U.S. National Archives hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of U.S. National Archives

The Unsung Equestrian Heroes Of World War I And The Plot To Poison Them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/522594344/522826590" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

(From left) Renee Chaney, visitor Louisa Parker, Linda Wertheimer and Kris Mortensen, in the first All Things Considered studio in 1972. NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

First Episode Of 'All Things Considered' Is Headed To Library Of Congress

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521808208/521884357" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Maia Stern, Adam Cole/NPR

Watch Earth's History Play Out On A Football Field

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/502920622/503052672" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In 1876, O.G. Mason, Bellevue's official photographer, took a carefully staged photograph of a blood transfusion in progress. Courtesy of the Lillian and Clarence de la Chapelle Medical Archives at NYU/Doubleday hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the Lillian and Clarence de la Chapelle Medical Archives at NYU/Doubleday

Bellevue Hospital Pioneered Care For Presidents And Paupers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/502301891/502345106" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Winston Churchill was so displeased with Graham Sutherland's portrait that his wife asked his secretary to destroy it. Pictured here is a preparatory sketch. Reprinted from "The Face of Britain" by Simon Schama with permission from Oxford University Press/National Portrait Gallery, London hide caption

toggle caption
Reprinted from "The Face of Britain" by Simon Schama with permission from Oxford University Press/National Portrait Gallery, London

'The Face Of Britain' Tells A Nation's History Through Portraits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/494591296/494619572" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Daja Moorer performs an original monologue acting as the Hull House founder Jane Addams at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. Moorer chose to portray Jane Addams for Portraits Alive! because of the mysterious nature of the portrait. Ruby Wallau/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ruby Wallau/NPR

A crowd of over 4,000 people filled the Gospel Tabernacle in Fort Wayne, Ind., to hear Col. Charles Lindbergh address a rally of the America First Committee on October 3, 1941. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

'America First,' Invoked By Trump, Has A Complicated History

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487097111/487151549" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trinity Church archivist Anne Petrimoulx stands in front of Alexander Hamilton's grave in New York City. The site has seen a surge in visitors following the popular Broadway musical, Hamilton. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Melissa Block/NPR

'Hamilton' Fans Pilgrimage To Founding Father's Once-Forgotten Grave

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480642073/480657697" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Archaeological conservator Luisa Duarte holds a Roman waxed writing tablet at Bloomberg's London offices on Wednesday. This tablet contains the earliest written reference to London, dated A.D. 65-80; it reads "Londinio Mogontio" --€” that is, "in London, to Mogontius." Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images

The sign, a private marker placed by the NAACP, and approved by the National Park Service, as it now stands in Army Park. Christopher Blank/WKNO-FM hide caption

toggle caption
Christopher Blank/WKNO-FM

Do The Words 'Race Riot' Belong On A Historic Marker In Memphis?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476450908/476498797" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript