A subway ride hammers home the reality that many Muslims face: While they fear being hurt by terrorists and vigilantes, others see them as a threat. Ashley Mackenzie for NPR hide caption

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Ashley Mackenzie for NPR

Muslim 'Twoness': Fearful Of Some, Feared By Others

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Men attend Friday prayers at a mosque in Edison, N.J. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Joel Rose/NPR

In Fight Against Islamophobia, Muslim Americans Focus On The Ballot Box

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Ashley Mackenzie for NPR

Sept. 11 Marked Turning Point For Muslims In Increasingly Diverse America

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President Obama took on his critics Tuesday, saying of the "radical Islam" term, "What exactly would using this label accomplish? What exactly would it change? Would it make ISIS less committed to trying to kill Americans? Would it bring in more allies?" Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Sheikh Hassan Lachheb conducts the Portrait of a Prophet course in Lanham, Md. The course is based on the stories of the Hadith, personal recollections of the Prophet Muhammad put down in writing about two centuries after his death. Courtesy of CelebrateMercy hide caption

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Courtesy of CelebrateMercy

Fighting Extremism With Knowledge: Learning The Lessons Of Muhammad

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A group of young Muslim friends in Washington, D.C., meets occasionally to support each other in their work and discuss the struggles their community faces. Brandon Chew/NPR hide caption

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Brandon Chew/NPR

This Is Our Islam: To Be Young, Devout And Muslim In America Today

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As members of the local Muslim community, Summer Hamad and her daughter Marjan Hamad were personally affected by the murder of three young Muslim-Americans in Chapel Hill, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2015. After the shootings, they both decided to begin wearing the hijab. Reema Khrais hide caption

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Reema Khrais

Shaken By Shooting, North Carolina Muslims Emerge 'Proud' One Year Later

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Courtesy of Nada Zohdy

Young American Muslims Face Pressure, Are Optimistic Of Increasing Tolerance

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Asma Khan of Chicago at the booth for her business, Soap Ethics. Monique Parsons for NPR hide caption

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Monique Parsons for NPR

Startups Cater To Muslim Millennials With Dating Apps And Vegan Halal Soap

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Ahmed Mohamed speaks during a news conference on Wednedsay in Irving, Texas. The 14-year-old was detained for building what a teacher thought was a bomb; it was an alarm clock. Ben Torres/Getty Images hide caption

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Sheep are sold in small lots like this one at the Centennial Livestock Auction in Fort Collins, Colo. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media/KUNC hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media/KUNC

Sheep Ranchers Count On American Muslims To Keep Lamb On Menu

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This image provided by the Durham County Sheriff's Office shows a booking photo of Craig Stephen Hicks, 46, who was arrested on three counts of murder early Wednesday. On his Facebook page, Hicks described himself as a gun-toting atheist. Durham County Sheriff's Office/AP hide caption

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Durham County Sheriff's Office/AP

Some See Extreme 'Anti-Theism' As Motive In N.C. Killings

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Ahmed Ismail, a soccer coach, runs the West Bank Athletic Club in Minneapolis. His players practice near a large Somali community where young people have been recruited to fight in overseas conflicts. Craig Lassig/AP hide caption

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Craig Lassig/AP

Sheikh Reda Shata stands in the men's prayer room at his mosque, The Islamic Center of Monmouth County, in Middletown, N.J., in Oct. 2011. From 2002 onward, Muslims in New Jersey allege police routinely monitored their comings and goings as part of a surveillance program. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP