John Wilkes Booth was the son of prominent, wealthy actors. He, too, became an actor and was so popular, he was one of the first to have his clothes ripped off by fans. Hulton Archive/Getty hide caption

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Who Was John Wilkes Booth Before He Became Lincoln's Assassin?

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Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president, used to cook alongside his wife. Brady/Getty Images hide caption

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President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address as inscribed on the stone at the Lincoln Memorial. Pat Benic/UPI/Landov hide caption

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The Gettysburg Address, read by historian Eric Foner and NPR staff

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An undated photo provided by The Patriot-News showing a bit of the 1863 editorial in which President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address was dismissed. The newspaper (then known as The Patriot & Union) referred to Lincoln's words as "silly remarks." AP hide caption

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A U.S soldier of 82nd Airborne patrols near a forward base in the Ghorak district of Kandahar southern Afghanistan. Rafiq Maqbool/AP hide caption

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The altered "5." U.S. National Archives and Records Administration hide caption

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Date On Lincoln Document 'Started To Look A Little Hinky,' Archivist Says

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