The EgyptAir logo on a building at Cairo International Airport. EgyptAir Flight 804 was carrying 66 people from Paris to Cairo on May 19 when it crashed in the Mediterranean. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Tourists sunbathe in a resort in Sharm el-Sheikh. Tourism has fallen dramatically since a Russian jet crashed after taking off from the town last November. Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yahia Kalash, the head of the journalists union, holds a candle during a vigil on May 24 for the recent victims of an EgyptAir crash. Kalash and two other board members of the journalists union are facing trial on allegations they published false news and harbored journalists wanted by authorities. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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In Egypt's Broad Crackdown, Prominent Journalists Are Now Facing Trial

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A shop owner waits for customers in a market in the resort town of Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. Over the past nine months, tourism has plummeted in the country after a series of deadly attacks. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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People Aren't Coming To See The Pyramids Or Snorkel In The Red Sea

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Egyptians pray for the victims of EgyptAir Flight 804 at Al-Thawrah Mosque in Cairo on Friday. The Egyptian military said it had found some wreckage of the plane, which was carrying 66 people when it went down early Thursday over the Mediterranean Sea. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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'What Can You Say?' An Egyptian Man Mourns The Loss Of 4 Loved Ones

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Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi (right), hosts U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry at the presidential palace in Cairo on Wednesday. Sissi has touted his ability to bring order, but the country has looked increasingly shaky recently. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Egyptian protesters demonstrate in Cairo on April 25, 2016, against the handing over of two Red Sea islands to Saudi Arabia. The people sentenced are accused of participating in the protest. Mohamed el-Shahed /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Passage of the Red Sea, illustration by William Hole (1846-1917). Exodus 14:16: "but lift thou up thy rod, and stretch out thine hand over the sea, and divide it: and the children of Israel shall go on dry ground through the midst of the sea." Corbis Images hide caption

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Egyptian human rights activist Hossam Bahgat (center) leaves a Cairo courtroom on Wednesday after a hearing in which the state requested a travel ban and freeze of his assests. The government has taken action against a number of groups and activists in what crictis say is an attempt to suppress opposition. MOHAMED EL-SHAHED/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Crackdown In Egypt, Reflecting A Broader Trend In The Region

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