Mohammed Badr, a cameraman for Al-Jazeera, appears at a court in Cairo, on Dec. 4, 2013. He is among the journalists referred to the Egyptian criminal court Wednesday. Ahmed Omar/AP hide caption

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Egyptians watch a television screen showing the trial of ousted President Mohammed Morsi on Tuesday in Cairo. Khaled Elfiqi/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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A man carries an Egyptian police officer to an ambulance after Friday's blast at the Egyptian police headquarters in downtown Cairo. Khalil Hamra/AP hide caption

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Supporters of Tunisia's secular Popular Front on Tuesday celebrate the third anniversary of the ouster of dictator Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. The country is on the verge of approving a new constitution that was negotiated by Islamist and secular political parties. Anis Mili/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Ballots are seen at a polling station in Cairo on Wednesday, the second day of voting in a referendum on a new constitution. Mohammed Bendari /APA /Landov hide caption

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A woman casts her ballot Tuesday at a polling station in Nasr City, Cairo. Amru Salahuddien /Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Leila Fadel talks with Renee Montagne about the voting in Egypt

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Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood at Al-Azhar university make the four-finger Rabaa gesture as they hold tear gas canisters during clashes with riot police and residents of the area at the university's campus in Cairo on Saturday. Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood run from tear gas during clashes with riot police near Cairo's Rabaa al-Adawiya square on Nov. 22. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The High Price Egyptians Pay For Opposing Their Rulers

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  • Transcript

A new survey of gender experts finds that in the Arab world, Egyptian women face the worst treatment. Here, women attend a political march to the presidential palace in Cairo in February. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Women supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted president Mohamed Morsi take part in a march through the streets of Cairo on November 8, 2013. Gianluigi Guercia /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi rallied outside the police academy in Cairo where his trial was opened, and quickly adjourned, on Monday. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Japan's Mizuho Financial Group Inc. said it had punished a total of 54 current and former executives over its loans to organized crime groups, but a third-party panel found no sign of a deliberate cover-up. Mizuho Bank president Yasuhiko Sato said his salary would be cut for six months and other executives would step down from their posts or face pay reductions. Frank Robichon/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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