Nobel Prize Nobel Prize

Can Britney Spears still stop traffic? They seem to think so in Tel Aviv. Kevin Winter/Getty Images for iHeartMedia hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images for iHeartMedia

Singer Bob Dylan Finally Gets His Nobel Prize

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Bob Dylan, who announced he would accept in person the Nobel Prize for Literature, was silent after it was announced he would receive the prize. Boris Horvat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Star Wars has devoted fans who dress up like their favorite characters, but now Lucasfilm, the film's parent company, is saying the New York Jedi and Lightsaber Academy went too far. Lucasfilm filed a lawsuit in which it noted that the academy's logos were too similar to the logos used in the film. Mike Coppola/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Coppola/Getty Images

Luke Perry Makes The Cover Of AARP

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Bob Dylan performed on the Late Show with David Letterman in 2015. CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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A Nobel In Literature For Bob Dylan, Whose Words Transcend Form

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Winners of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, economists Oliver Hart (left) and Bengt Holmström, are displayed on a screen at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm on Monday. They won the prize for their work on contract theory. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images

The winners of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry are displayed on a screen during a press conference to announce the winners at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm on Wednesday. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images

Winners of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics are displayed on a screen during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm on Tuesday. David J. Thouless, F. Duncan M. Haldane and J. Michael Kosterlitz were awarded the 2016 Nobel Physics Prize "for theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter." Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images

Sir Harold W. Kroto, a winner of the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, gave a lecture on nanoarchitecture in May 2007, in Brussels. "Find something to do where only your best effort will satisfy you," he advised students. Sebastien Pirlet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastien Pirlet/AFP/Getty Images

Listen: Sir Harry Kroto Was More Than A Nobel Prize Winner

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Kroto displays a model of his discovery in 1996: a soccer ball-shape carbon molecule that spawned a new field of study and could act as a tiny cage to transport other chemicals. Michael Scates/AP hide caption

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Michael Scates/AP

A Discoverer Of The Buckyball Offers Tips On Winning A Nobel Prize

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