A Swiss cardiologist plots a cheeky graph that shows a country's chocolate consumption may predict its chances of winning a Nobel. John Loo/Flickr.com hide caption

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The Secret To Genius? It Might Be More Chocolate

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NIST physicist and Nobel Prize-winner David Wineland adjusts an ultraviolet laser beam used to manipulate ions in a high-vacuum apparatus containing an "ion trap." These devices have been used to demonstrate the basic operations required for a quantum computer. Copyright Geoffrey Wheeler/National Institute of Standards and Technology hide caption

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Elinor Ostrom in January 2011. Raveendran /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Elinor Ostrom, speaking with Michele Norris

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"I'm 101 at the moment," Ronald Coase said. University of Chicago hide caption

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Nobel Laureate: 'I've Been Wrong So Often, I Don't Find It Extraordinary At All'

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The 5,000 krona note, featuring Ragnheiaur Jonsdottir Jesse Garrison/Flickr hide caption

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Should Iceland Kill The Krona?

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Left to right: Nobel Peace Prize laureates President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia, Liberian "peace warrior" Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkul Karman of Yemen.

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NPR's Philip Reeves

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Remnants of Tycho's Supernova, seen in an X-ray/infrared composite image. The supernova was observed by Tycho Brahe and other skywatchers in 1572.

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