In this image made from video broadcast by the Qatari-based satellite television station Al Jazeera in 2001, a young boy, left, identified as Hamza bin Laden holds what the Taliban says is a piece of U.S. helicopter wreckage in Ghazni, Afghanistan. AP/Al-Jazeera hide caption

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AP/Al-Jazeera

Former Navy SEAL Matthew Bissonnette has agreed to forfeit "all of the proceeds" he received from No Easy Day, his book about the killing of Osama bin Laden. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden speaks to a selected group of reporters in the mountains of Helmand province in southern Afghanistan in 1998. It has been five years since he was killed in a U.S. raid in Pakistan. Rahimullah Yousafzai/AP hide caption

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Rahimullah Yousafzai/AP

Recenty released letters from former al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden show he warned against declaring an Islamic state too soon. He also feared that rival jihadist groups could battle each other, as has happened between al-Qaida and ISIS. Uncredited/AP hide caption

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Uncredited/AP

Osama Bin Laden Warned Of Civil War Between Jihadi Groups

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Osama bin Laden wrote in a will that he had a fortune of about $29 million and that he wanted it spent "on Jihad." The will was among more than 100 bin Laden documents released Tuesday by the U.S. government. Rahimullah Yousafzai/AP hide caption

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Rahimullah Yousafzai/AP

An undated file picture shows Osama bin Laden. A new Wikileaks release purports to reveal that one of his sons requested a death certificate for the al-Qaida leader, who was killed in a U.S. military raid in 2011. EPA/Landov hide caption

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EPA/Landov

Pakistani doctor Shakil Afridi, in 2010, who has faced legal troubles since he took DNA samples that helped prove Osama bin Laden was in Abbottabad. Qazi Rauf/AP hide caption

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Qazi Rauf/AP

President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and other members of his national security team as they monitored the mission that ended with the death of Osama bin Laden in May 2011. Pete Souza/White House hide caption

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Pete Souza/White House

A man identified as Sulaiman Abu Ghaith appears in this still image taken from an undated video address. A son-in-law of Osama bin Laden who served as al Qaeda's spokesman, Abu Gaith was detained in Jordan and sent to the United States. HANDOUT/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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HANDOUT/Reuters /Landov

Bin Laden's Son-In-Law Arrested, Brought To U.S.

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