Vyacheslav Trubnikov (right) was head of the Foreign Intelligence Service, Russia's equivalent of the CIA, from 1996 to 2000. He's shown here speaking with U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage in 2001 in Moscow. Trubnikov was Russia's deputy foreign minister at the time. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Russia's Ex-Spy Chief Shares Opinions Of His American Counterparts

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International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach says there's still a way Russian track athletes could compete in Rio this summer. He's seen here at a news conference in March. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. soldiers carry a 155 mm artillery round for a live-fire training exercise during the Anakonda war games near Olezno, Poland, on June 14. Sgt. Ashley Marble/55th Combat Camera via DVIDS hide caption

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NATO War Games In Poland Get Russia's Attention

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The new Russian nuclear-powered icebreaker Arktika launches in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Thursday. Russia has been modernizing its icebreaker fleet as part of its efforts to strengthen its Arctic presence. Evgeny Uvarov/AP hide caption

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At the height of the Cold War, the FBI and the National Security Agency built a secret tunnel beneath the Russian Embassy (shown here in 2013), so that American spies could eavesdrop on what was happening inside. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Decades After Cold War's End, U.S.-Russia Espionage Rivalry Evolves

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Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz said the DNC is working to secure its network as quickly as possible. She's shown here in 2014. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Russian Hackers Penetrate Democratic National Committee, Steal Trump Research

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Ukrainian pilot Nadiya Savchenko (center), who was freed from jail in Russia as part of a prisoner exchange, talks to the media upon arrival at Kiev's Boryspil airport on Wednesday. Anatolii Stepanov /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jehovah's Witnesses sing songs during a meeting in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, in November 2015. The country's top prosecutor is threatening a nationwide ban for alleged "extremism." Alexander Aksakov/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Russia's Jehovah's Witnesses Fight 'Extremist' Label, Possible Ban

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People in Moscow hold portraits of relatives who fought in World War II during the Immortal Regiment march on the day of the 71st anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany in World War II. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Journalists walk near parts of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 near the Grabove village in eastern Ukraine on Nov. 11, 2014. MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Russian Military Involved In Shooting Down Flight MH17, Researchers Say

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An independent paper owned by billionaire Russian businessman and Brooklyn Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov — shown here Jan. 11 in New York — is under fire, but the Kremlin says it's not applying pressure on media. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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For Journalists In Russia, 'No One Really Knows What Is Allowed'

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Russian President Vladimir Putin gestures while answering a question during his annual televised call-in show in central Moscow on Thursday. Mikhail Klimentyev/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Employees prepare a convoy of four trucks transporting warm clothes and shoes to refugees in Ukraine, at the initiative of the French Red Cross, on Feb. 26 in Saint-Quentin-Fallavier, France. JEAN-PHILIPPE KSIAZEK/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ukrainians Who Fled To Russia Find The Welcome Is No Longer Warm

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