House Intelligence Committee chairman Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., finds himself the center of attention after playing something of a dual role — Trump supporter and independent investigator. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Thousands Of Russians Take To Streets In Biggest Anti-government Protests In Years

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Devin Nunes, R-Calif., chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, speaks to the media about the investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Friday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Denis Voronenkov was shot in the head on a sidewalk in Ukraine's capital city, Kiev, on Thursday. He's seen here with his wife, Maria Maksakova, in February. Oleksandr Synytsia/AP hide caption

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A view of the Trump Park Avenue building in New York. President Trump's properties have been attracting a large and generous circle of buyers, from wealthy Russians to a Chinese businesswoman, and many questions are being raised about the ethics of these deals. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption

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Frank Franklin II/AP

When Is A Deal Just A Deal? When Trump Sells A Property, It's Not Always Clear

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Former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, seen here last June, was paid millions of dollars to advance a pro-Russian agenda, the AP reports. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Trump Campaign Head Manafort Was Paid Millions By A Putin Ally, AP Says

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FBI Director James Comey and National Security Agency Director Mike Rogers testify during the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Russian actions during the 2016 election campaign. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Comey (left) and Rogers take their seats, surrounded by members of the media, ahead of the start of the House hearing. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Top House Democrats, including Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md. (at the podium), said this week they want an investigation into President Trump's connections with Russia, such as when he learned that his national security adviser, Michael Flynn, had discussed U.S. sanctions with a Russian diplomat. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Members of the European Union Monitoring Mission peer through binoculars at the boundary line between Georgia and South Ossetia. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Along A Shifting Border, Georgia And Russia Maintain An Uneasy Peace

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Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Air Force Gen. Paul Selva (left) confirmed longstanding suspicions that Russia's new intermediate-range missile was operational. He told a House Armed Services Committee hearing this week that it can threaten almost all of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Confirms Russian Missile Deployment Violates Nuclear Treaty. Now What?

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Pomades is one of half-a-dozen barbershops on a single block in central Moscow. Until recently, Russian society took a narrow view of masculinity. Real men weren't supposed to worry about hair or skincare. Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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In Moscow, New Barbershops Trim Away Old Notions Of Russian Masculinity

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