Mufti Ismail Berdiev (right) is a religious leader in the Republic of Dagestan. When a report documented female genital mutilation in this republic, he said all women should be circumcised "to end depravity." He later said he was joking. Above, he poses with Russian President Vladimir Putin at a Kremlin ceremony in March. Mikhail Metzel/TASS hide caption

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Demonstrators hold Russian opposition flags during a rally protesting election fraud in Moscow in 2011. Russian President Vladimir Putin blames Hillary Clinton for protests like this, which took place in 2011 and 2012. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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In Leak Of Democratic Emails, Questions About Russia's Role

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Russian President Vladimir Putin (center) joins Russia's federal highway agency head Roman Starovoit (left) and Crimean leader Sergei Aksyonov (second from left) on a visit to the Kerch Strait bridge construction site on Tuzla Island on March 18. The bridge will link Crimea to mainland Russia. Mikhail Klimentyev/AP hide caption

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Russia's Crimea Bridge Project Beset By Engineering Worries And Labor Woes

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Sir Philip Craven, president of the International Paralympic Committee, announces Sunday that the entire Russian Paralympic team will be barred from next month's games in Rio de Janeiro. "The anti-doping system in Russia is broken," he said. Joe Scarnici/Getty Images hide caption

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Russian President Vladimir Putin (front and center in dark suit) meets the country's Paralympic team in Moscow after it returned from the London Paralympic Games in 2012. The International Paralympic Committee plans to announce Sunday whether Russia's para athletes will be allowed to compete in the games next month in Brazil. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Russian President Vladimir Putin enters the St. George Hall of the Grand Kremlin Palace in Moscow. Sergei Ilnitsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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How The Trump Campaign Weakened The Republican Platform On Aid To Ukraine

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A family near the Siberian city of Salekhard. A heat wave is blamed for thawing a 75-year-old reindeer carcass, along with dormant spores of anthrax bacteria that infected it. Sergey Anisimov/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthrax Outbreak In Russia Thought To Be Result Of Thawing Permafrost

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A typical apartment building in Roslyakovo. Russian President Vladimir Putin signed papers ordering the town to open its doors to the world on Jan. 1, 2015. Mary Louise Kelly/NPR hide caption

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A Once-Closed Russian Military Town In The Arctic Opens To The World

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Russian Olympians, along with coaches and other officials, pose outside the Assumption Cathedral in Moscow on Wednesday before heading to Brazil. Russia had planned to send nearly 400 athletes to the Rio Games, but more than 110 have been banned because of a doping scandal. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Save the Children says the bombed maternity hospital it supports in the rebel-held Syrian province of Idlib served some 1,300 women and children a month. Save the Children hide caption

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In Russia's view, Hillary Clinton's campaign has raised the email hacking issue to draw attention away from the content of the leaked emails. Dake Kang/AP hide caption

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After Hacking Claims, Here's The View From Russia On The U.S. Campaign

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Russia recently introduced a new frigate, the Admiral Grigorovich, and invited journalists on board at the Russian base in Sevastopol, Crimea. While the Russians have had a naval base in Sevastopol since the 18th century, Russia's seizure of the entire Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine in 2014 has heightened tensions with NATO. Corey Flintoff/NPR hide caption

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The View From A Russian Frigate In Crimea

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Smoke rises over Saif Al Dawla district in Aleppo, Syria, in 2012. Russia and the Syrian government say they will open humanitarian corridors in Aleppo and offer a way out for opposition fighters wanting to lay down their arms, Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu said Thursday. Manu Brabo/AP hide caption

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