An independent paper owned by billionaire Russian businessman and Brooklyn Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov — shown here Jan. 11 in New York — is under fire, but the Kremlin says it's not applying pressure on media. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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For Journalists In Russia, 'No One Really Knows What Is Allowed'
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Russian President Vladimir Putin gestures while answering a question during his annual televised call-in show in central Moscow on Thursday. Mikhail Klimentyev/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Employees prepare a convoy of four trucks transporting warm clothes and shoes to refugees in Ukraine, at the initiative of the French Red Cross, on Feb. 26 in Saint-Quentin-Fallavier, France. JEAN-PHILIPPE KSIAZEK/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ukrainians Who Fled To Russia Find The Welcome Is No Longer Warm
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About 40 percent of Russia's food is imported. As the value of the ruble has declined, prices at grocery stores have risen. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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In Russia, The Oil Price Drop Hits Putin's Base Hard
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Ukrainian pilot Nadezhda Savchenko applauds and smiles in a glass cage inside court ahead of the verdict in the town of Donetsk, Rostov-on-Don region, Russia, on Tuesday. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

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Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) hosts Syrian President Bashar Assad during a meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow. The meeting took place in October, shortly after Russia began a bombing campaign in Syria in support of Assad. Putin abruptly announced Monday that Russia was withdrawing most of its military forces. Alexey Druzhinin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Russian bombers parked at Hmeimim air base in Syria on March 4. Since the cease-fire began in late February, the warplanes have mostly stayed on the ground. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Mikhail Lesin, a former Russian press minister and adviser to President Vladimir Putin, was found dead in November. A new report contradicts earlier reports in Russian media that he died from a heart attack. Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Russia's Vladimir Putin makes a speech in 2009 after receiving an award in Dresden, Germany, where he served as a KGB officer during the Cold War. Norbert Millauer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Spy Vs. Spies: Why Deciphering Putin Is So Hard For U.S. Intelligence
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Order 23 of the USSR People's Commissar of Defense, dated March 14, 1944, on transforming Civil Air Fleet 1st Separate Aviation Regiment into Civil Air Fleet 120th Guards Separate Aviation Regiment, bearing the signature of Joseph Stalin. Courtesy of the U.S.Embassy, Moscow, via Flickr hide caption

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U.S. Returns Historical Documents, Stolen From Russia In Chaotic '90s
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Members of Russia's Emergency Situations Ministry attend a ceremony for miners killed at the Severnaya coal mine in a town north of the Arctic Circle. Alexei Shtokal/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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A fake anti-smoking ad in Moscow reads: "Smoking kills more people than Obama, although he kills a lot of people. Don't smoke! Don't be like Obama!" Dmitry Gudkov/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Russian Pranksters Feature Obama In Fake Anti-Smoking Ad
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An aerial view of Rostov-on-Don region, where the fertile steppes support some of Russia's best farmland. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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For Russian Farmers, Climate Change Is Nyet So Great
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