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A Remote Town, A Closed-Off Courtroom, And A Father Facing Deportation

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Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal announces his veto of legislation that major corporations said could legalize discrimination. He said, "I do not think that we have to discriminate against anyone to protect the faith-based community in Georgia." David Goldman/AP hide caption

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Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal speaks during a press conference Monday in Atlanta to announce his rejection of a controversial "religious liberty" bill. He said: "I have examined the protections that this bill proposes to provide to the faith-based community and I can find no examples of any of those circumstances occurring in our state." David Goldman/AP hide caption

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Disney and other companies have threatened to stop film production in Georgia if the state's controversial "religious liberty" bill becomes law. AMC Networks, which films The Walking Dead in Georgia, has also spoken out against the bill. PR Newswire via AP hide caption

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A SolarCity employee installs a solar panel on the roof of a home in Los Angeles in 2014. California's utilities want to pay new solar customers less for their extra electricity and to add new monthly fees. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Like Night And Day: How Two States' Utilities Approach Solar

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The State Judicial Building in Montgomery, Ala., is seen in 2003. The state's top court ruled against the parental rights of a lesbian who adopted her partner's children in Georgia, and she's appealing that ruling to the Supreme Court. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Inmates Ted Stancil (from left), Steven Bass and Christopher Peeples, with their welding Instructor Jeremy Worley (standing in center) at Walker State Prison in Georgia. The inmates are working toward a welding certificate. Susanna Capelouto/WABE hide caption

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Amid A Shortage Of Welders, Some Prisons Offer Training

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Renee Mitchell says even though she has health insurance she'll have trouble paying for the eye surgery she needs to save her vision. Jim Burress/WABE hide caption

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Some Insured Patients Still Skipping Care Because Of High Costs

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The restoration of the landmark, popularized by a House of Cards episode, has some fans wondering whether the giant peach will lose its giggle-inducing appearance. Michael Tomsic/WFAE hide caption

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Often The Butt Of Jokes, S.C.'s Giant Peach Is Ripe For Renovation

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After a long day at the Somali American Community Center he founded in Clarkston, Ga., and then at an after-school program, Omar Shekhey drives a taxi to earn extra money. Often he gives his earnings to refugees to help them with expenses. Kevin Liles for NPR hide caption

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Engineer Turned Cabbie Helps New Refugees Find Their Way

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Census Bureau Tests New Online Survey In Small Towns Ahead Of 2020

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A 12-year-old on trial in the stabbing death of a 9-year-old talks to his lawyer in 2014 in a Michigan circuit court. The Justice Department is targeting a Georgia case in the hopes of making legal representation for juveniles there more effective, but they say the problems occur nationwide. Chris Clark/Landov hide caption

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Justice Department Weighs In On Assembly-Line Justice For Children

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Hundreds of adult wood storks gather on the tops of trees at the Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

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Old Land Battle Resurfaces In Georgia Between The Gullah And The Government

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Tybee Island, Ga., site of an annual sand arts festival, is a popular tourist destination. Local officials worry about a federal proposal to open areas off the coast to oil and gas development. Stephen Morton/Savannah College of Art and Design/AP hide caption

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Plans To Explore For Oil Offshore Worry East Coast Residents

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A new BMW X4 vehicle is unveiled during a March 2014 news conference at the BMW manufacturing plant in Greer, S.C. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Analysts Watch For Impacts Of European Economic Weakness On U.S.

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Lee Ann Johnson, director of the Missoula Indian Center, encourages Native Americans in Montana to enroll in private coverage through Healthcare.gov at an outreach event on Saturday, November 15. Eric Whitney hide caption

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As Heard On Morning Edition

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Jason Carter, the eldest grandson of former President Jimmy Carter, is running to become Georgia's next governor. Erik S. Lesser /Landov hide caption

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Grandpa Jimmy Carter Casts A Shadow Over Ga. Governor's Race

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A sign directs voters at a polling site in Atlanta. "Georgia is changing dramatically," Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jason Carter says. "There's no doubt that Georgia is next in line as a national battleground state." David Goldman/AP hide caption

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As Populations Shift, Democrats Hope To Paint The Sun Belt Blue

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