Beth Holloway, the mother of Natalee Holloway, started a center in 2010 to assist the families of people who had gone missing. Natalee's 2005 disappearance during a vacation in Aruba was widely covered in the news media. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Carter Page, a former foreign policy adviser to then-presidential candidate Donald Trump, speaks at a news conference at the RIA Novosti news agency in Moscow in December. Page said he was in Moscow to meet with businessmen and politicians. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Listen: Adam Entous on FBI's FISA Court Warrant To Monitor Page

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Federal authorities on Wednesday raided a San Gabriel, Calif., business they say fraudulently used a U.S. visa program to obtain green cards for wealthy Chinese investors. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

A State Department employee, accused of taking gifts from Chinese intelligence agents and not reporting the contacts, pleaded not guilty in a court appearance Wednesday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department K-9 officers search the Jewish Community Center of Southern Nevada after an employee received a suspicious phone call that led to the evacuation of about 10 people from the building on Feb. 27. A suspect in Israel has been arrested in connection with the waves of bomb threats like this one. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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FBI Director James Comey and National Security Agency Director Mike Rogers testify during the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Russian actions during the 2016 election campaign. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Police officers stand by as adults and children return to the St. Louis Jewish Community Center in St. Louis after canine units cleared the building Wednesday. According to St. Louis County Police, someone called the front desk claiming an explosive device was inside the center. Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP hide caption

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Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP

FBI Director James Comey, shown here testifying on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, has told friends and employees he had few good choices in the investigation into Clinton's handling of classified information on her private email server. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

DOJ Watchdog To Review Pre-Election Conduct Of FBI, Other Justice Officials

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William Evanina, the head of U.S. counterintelligence, estimates that more than 100 Russian spies are currently operating on U.S. soil. Courtesy of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence hide caption

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Courtesy of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence

For America's Top Spy Catcher, A World Of Problems To Fix — And Prevent

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Russian President Vladimir Putin in a meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow. U.S. intelligence agencies agree that Russia intervened in the presidential election to help Donald Trump. Mikhail Klimentyev/AP hide caption

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Mikhail Klimentyev/AP

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and John Podesta arrive for a portrait unveiling ceremony for retiring Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., last week. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

U.S. intelligence agencies charge that operatives with ties to Russia and Vladimir Putin's (above) administration hacked private Clinton and Democratic National Committee emails during the presidential election and released them via WikiLeaks. Darko Vojinovic/AP hide caption

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Darko Vojinovic/AP