Two versions of a letter from Christopher Columbus about his discovery of the New World are displayed in Rome. The book on the bottom, produced centuries ago, has just been returned after having been stolen and replaced with a forgery (top). Domenico Stinellis/AP hide caption

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Stolen Letter From Columbus Found In The Library Of Congress And Returned To Italy

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Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel speaks at the 84th winter meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors in January in Washington, D.C. Mandel Ngan /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Attorney General Loretta Lynch and FBI Director James Comey stand by a poster showing Iranians who are wanted by the FBI for computer hacking during a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington on Thursday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Ferguson City Council's acceptance of the consent decree means the city retains control of the police and courts, but also pays for an independent monitor to ensure the reforms are implemented. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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The FBI wants to access data on a password-protected phone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A trader works earlier this month alongside the New York Stock Exchange post where shares of Lumber Liquidators are traded. The company's stock price has been falling ever since a 60 Minutes report on the cancer risk from some of its floor products. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Ferguson mayor James Knowles III, (second from left) speaks during a city council meeting on Feb. 2. The meeting was the first opportunity for residents to speak directly with city leaders about the preliminary consent agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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President Obama arrives at the White House on Monday, after a trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. Obama wrote an op-ed in Monday's Washington Post announcing new limits on the use of solitary confinement in federal prisons. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Hillary Clinton stands for a portrait in San Antonio. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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'Top Secret' Email Revelation Changes 'Nothing,' Clinton Says

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Goldman CEO Lloyd Blankfein, shown here at a September 2014 panel discussion, says he is pleased to resolve the allegations against the firm. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Darrell Cannon was tortured into confessing to a crime he didn't commit and was sentenced to life in prison. He was exonerated in 2004 and released from prison in 2007. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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With Chicago Police Investigation, Advocates Ask, What Took So Long?

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