The Idaho Correctional Center south of Boise, Idaho, is a contract facility operated by Corrections Corporation of America. The Justice Department says it is phasing out its relationships with private prisons after a recent audit found they have more safety and security problems than ones run by the government. Charlie Litchfield/AP hide caption

toggle caption Charlie Litchfield/AP

Justice Department Will Phase Out Its Use Of Private Prisons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/490498158/490524055" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Justice Department released a report Wednesday morning that was highly critical of the Baltimore Police Department for systematically stopping, searching and arresting the city's black residents, frequently without grounds for doing so. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Win McNamee/Getty Images

Lezley McSpadden (right) led a march to the street where her son, Michael Brown, died two years ago in Ferguson, Mo. Gwen Carr, mother of Eric Garner, is dressed in blue, and Samaria Rice, mother of Tamir Rice, is dressed in white. Both Eric Garner and Tamir Rice died in high-profile incidents with police. Durrie Bouscaren/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption Durrie Bouscaren/St. Louis Public Radio

Revisiting Ferguson: 2 Years After The Shooting Of Michael Brown

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/489158667/489284090" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Obama smiles during a joint news conference with Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at the White House Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

John Hinckley Jr. is escorted by police in Washington, D.C., following his arrest after shooting and seriously wounding president Ronald Reagan on March 30, 1981. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption AFP/Getty Images

The Department of Justice is suing Anthem to block a proposed deal to buy rival Cigna and to block another proposed health insurance merger between Aetna and Humana. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

toggle caption Michael Conroy/AP

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch, seen with FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, says monies misappropriated from the 1MDB fund passed through U.S. financial institutions. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch listens at a press conference on June 22 in Washington, D.C. Allison Shelley/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Allison Shelley/Getty Images

Lynch Will Accept Recommendations Of Lawyers, Agents On Clinton Email Probe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484295432/484381735" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A critic of the New York City Police Department stop-and-frisk policy wears a shirt outlining a citizen's search rights at a City Council meeting in August 2013. The Supreme Court ruled Monday in an unrelated case that even if police stop someone without cause, if a reason is then found to search them, any evidence collected is admissible in court. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Law enforcement officials block off the road near Pulse nightclub on June 15 as they continue the investigation into the shooting there. The Justice Department on Monday released a transcript of a 911 call that Omar Mateen made the night of the shooting. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A federal judge has agreed to end a trial of FedEx which started Monday in San Francisco. The firm had been accused of shipping packages from illegal online pharmacies. Prosecutors did not specify why they abruptly moved to drop the case. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

toggle caption Seth Perlman/AP

Two versions of a letter from Christopher Columbus about his discovery of the New World are displayed in Rome. The book on the bottom, produced centuries ago, has just been returned after having been stolen and replaced with a forgery (top). Domenico Stinellis/AP hide caption

toggle caption Domenico Stinellis/AP

Stolen Letter From Columbus Found In The Library Of Congress And Returned To Italy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478580542/478592676" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel speaks at the 84th winter meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors in January in Washington, D.C. Mandel Ngan /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Mandel Ngan /AFP/Getty Images