U.S. authorities are working on an emergency deal to import the yellow fever vaccine Stamaril, which is not currently licensed in the U.S. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Amianthus, a variety of asbestos. Exposure to the fibers can cause mesothelioma, a cancer of the thin membranes that line the chest and abdomen. DEA Picture Library/Getty Images/DeAgostini hide caption

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DEA Picture Library/Getty Images/DeAgostini

Puerto Rico resident Michelle Flandez caresses her two-month-old son Inti Perez, diagnosed with microcephaly linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the Zika virus continues to impact a small number of pregnant women and their babies in the U.S. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Under the old rules, the CDC's authority was primarily limited to detaining travelers entering the U.S. or crossing state lines. With the new rules, the CDC would be able to detain people anywhere in the country, without getting approval from state and local officials. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

CDC Seeks Controversial New Quarantine Powers To Stop Outbreaks

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Candida auris is a fungus that can cause invasive infections, is associated with high mortality and is often resistant to multiple antifungal drugs, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC hide caption

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A government worker sprays mosquito insecticide fog in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, earlier this month to block the spread of Zika. The U.S. CDC advises pregnant women to reconsider plans to travel to Malaysia and 10 other countries because of the virus. Joshua Paul/AP hide caption

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Joshua Paul/AP

Pregnant Women Should Consider Not Traveling To Southeast Asia

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A Florida Department of Health employee processes a urine sample to test for the Zika virus on Sept. 14 in Miami Beach. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Reporter's Notebook: Pregnant And Caught In Zika Test Limbo

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Fourth-grader Jasmine Johnson got a FluMist spray at her Annapolis, Md., elementary school in 2007. This year, the nasal spray vaccine isn't recommended. Susan Biddle/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Susan Biddle/Washington Post/Getty Images

These pills were made to look like Oxycodone, but they're actually an illicit form of the potent painkiller fentanyl. A surge in police seizures of illicit fentanyl parallels a rise in overdose deaths. Tommy Farmer/Tennessee Bureau of Investigation/AP hide caption

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Tommy Farmer/Tennessee Bureau of Investigation/AP

Stacks of boxes containing critical supplies stretch almost as far as the eye can see in this Strategic National Stockpile warehouse. Courtesy of the CDC hide caption

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Courtesy of the CDC

Inside A Secret Government Warehouse Prepped For Health Catastrophes

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Courtesy of Johns Hopkins University Press

The Epidemiologist Who Crushed The Glass Ceiling And Media Stupidity

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A baby born with microcephaly in Brazil is examined by a neurologist. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

Zika Is Linked To Microcephaly, Health Agencies Confirm

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When it comes to chronic pain relief, the CDC is asking doctors and patients to think about alternatives to opioids. Robin Nelson/Zumapress.com/Corbis hide caption

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Robin Nelson/Zumapress.com/Corbis

CDC Has Advice For Primary Care Doctors About Opioids

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A trader works earlier this month alongside the New York Stock Exchange post where shares of Lumber Liquidators are traded. The company's stock price has been falling ever since a 60 Minutes report on the cancer risk from some of its floor products. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Mylene Helena Ferraira of Recife, Brazil, carries her 5-month-old son, David Henrique Ferreira, who was born with microcephaly. She's returning home after a medical visit. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

CDC Arrives In Brazil To Investigate Zika Outbreak

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Fred Muzaya, a 26-year-old Ugandan who has AIDS, prepares for a spinal tap to relieve the pressure in his skull, brought on by the fungal disease cryptococcal meningitis. Patrick Adams hide caption

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Patrick Adams
Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Health Agencies Intensify Fight Against Zika Virus

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