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Truvada can dramatically reduce the risk of HIV infection when taken as a preventative medicine — if taken every day. Studies are underway to determine if young people are likely to take the pill consistently. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Would A Pill To Protect Teens From HIV Make Them Feel Invincible?

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Stringy particles of Ebola virus (blue) bud from a chronically infected cell (yellow-green) in this colorized, scanning electron micrograph. NIAID/Science Source hide caption

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NIAID/Science Source

Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, talks with Doctors Without Borders staff during a visit in August to an Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Ebola patient Amber Vinson arrived by ambulance at Emory University Hospital on Oct. 15. Now healthy, Vinson was discharged from the hospital Tuesday. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Emory Hospital Shares Lessons Learned On Ebola Care

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Dallas nurse Nina Pham speaks at a press conference after she was confirmed free of Ebola and released from a National Institutes of Health facility on Friday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Was CDC Too Quick To Blame Dallas Nurses In Care Of Ebola Patient?

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At a CDC training session for clinicians headed to West Africa, a medical worker practices sanitizing hands after drawing blood from a mannequin portraying an Ebola patient. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP