John Hartigan, proprietor of Vapeology LA, a store selling electronic cigarettes and related items, takes a puff from an electronic cigarette in Los Angeles. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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Surgeon General Adds New Risks To Long List Of Smoking's Harms

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's PulseNet service monitors clusters of sickness linked to potentially dangerous strains of foodborne pathogens such as E.coli or salmonella. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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CDC: Shutdown Strains Foodborne Illness Tracking

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The Eagle Mountain Church in Newark, Texas, was linked to at least 21 cases of measles this year, mostly in children. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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Small declines in obesity among young kids could help stem bigger problems in the future. Ocean/Corbis hide caption

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Falling Obesity Rates Among Preschoolers Mark Healthful Trend

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A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds no link between the number of vaccinations a young child receives and the risk of developing autism spectrum disorders. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Number Of Early Childhood Vaccines Not Linked To Autism

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A woman uses a cellphone while driving in Los Angeles in 2011. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Klebsiella pneumoniae, seen here with an electron microscope, are the most common superbugs causing highly drug-resistant infections in hospitals. Kwangshin Kim/Science Source hide caption

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Infections With 'Nightmare Bacteria' Are On The Rise In U.S. Hospitals

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Kimberly Delp gives a flu shot to Carleen Matthews at the Homewood Senior Center in Pittsburgh, Pa., last September. Andrew Rush/AP hide caption

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