HIV HIV

A December celebration launching a partnership between members of the Garifuna community and a doctor in New York. The collaboration is aimed at reducing the HIV infection rate among the Garifuna. Alexandra Starr/NPR hide caption

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Alexandra Starr/NPR

An Unlikely Alliance Fights HIV In The Bronx's Afro-Honduran Diaspora

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Augustine Goba (right) heads the laboratory at Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone. He and colleagues analyzed the viral genetics in blood samples from 78 Ebola patients early in the epidemic. Stephen Gire/AP hide caption

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Stephen Gire/AP

Could This Virus Be Good For You?

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David Adam is a writer and editor at the journal Nature and was a special correspondent at the Guardian, writing about science, medicine and the environment. Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, LLC hide caption

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Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, LLC

Why OCD Is 'Miserable': A Science Reporter's Obsession With Contracting HIV

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In Philadelphia, some drug users are selling clean needles from needle exchange programs on the street. Researchers say the black market isn't necessarily a bad thing. ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

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ImageZoo/Corbis

Needle Exchange Program Creates Black Market In Clean Syringes

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Over a decade ago, rumors spread in South Africa that sex with a virgin could cure HIV/AIDS. In 2001, 150 people gathered in Cape Town to protest the rape of children and even babies, allegedly as a result of belief in this canard. Anna Zieminski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Zieminski/AFP/Getty Images

Truvada has been around for a decade as a treatment for people who are already HIV-positive. In the last few years, it has also been shown to prevent new infections, and New York officials are embracing the pill as a way to prevent the spread of AIDS. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As New York Embraces HIV-Preventing Pill, Some Voice Doubts

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Dr. Lisa Sterman held a Truvada pill at her office in San Francisco in 2012. She prescribed Truvada to patients at high risk for HIV infection even before the Food and Drug Administration approved the medicine explicitly for that purpose. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP