Doctors sew a kidney into a recipient patient during a kidney transplant at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 2012 in Baltimore, Md. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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HIV-Positive Organ Transplants Set To Begin At Johns Hopkins
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No, he didn't repossess this car from a corrupt official. As a hobby, global health avenger Cees Klumper fixes up classic cars. This one is the actual El Camino used in the TV series My Name Is Earl. Klumper tracked it down and had it shipped to Geneva. Courtesy of Anneke Cees Klumper hide caption

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Truvada can dramatically reduce the risk of HIV infection when taken as a preventative medicine — if taken every day. Studies are underway to determine if young people are likely to take the pill consistently. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Would A Pill To Protect Teens From HIV Make Them Feel Invincible?
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A December celebration launching a partnership between members of the Garifuna community and a doctor in New York. The collaboration is aimed at reducing the HIV infection rate among the Garifuna. Alexandra Starr/NPR hide caption

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An Unlikely Alliance Fights HIV In The Bronx's Afro-Honduran Diaspora
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Patient Nina Pham is hugged by Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, outside of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., on Friday. Pham was discharged after testing free of Ebola. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Peter Piot was one of the co-discoverers of the Ebola virus in 1976. "I never thought we would see such a devastating and vast epidemic," he says. Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Co-Discoverer Of Ebola Never Imagined An Outbreak Like This
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Over a decade ago, rumors spread in South Africa that sex with a virgin could cure HIV/AIDS. In 2001, 150 people gathered in Cape Town to protest the rape of children and even babies, allegedly as a result of belief in this canard. Anna Zieminski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Truvada has been around for a decade as a treatment for people who are already HIV-positive. In the last few years, it has also been shown to prevent new infections, and New York officials are embracing the pill as a way to prevent the spread of AIDS. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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As New York Embraces HIV-Preventing Pill, Some Voice Doubts
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Joep Lange led many early drug trials of HIV therapies and studied how to prevent HIV-positive pregnant women from transmitting the virus to their babies. Jean Ayissi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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At a July 18 press conference at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport, Vice President of Malaysia Airlines Europe Huib Gorter talk about the crash of flight MH17. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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AIDS drugs line a pharmacy's shelves. A new recommendation from the World Health Organization suggests a daily anti-HIV pill for men who have sex with men. Astrid Riecken/MCT/Landov hide caption

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United Nations Aids Executive Director Michel Sibide hugs Secretary of State Hillary Clinton after they they presented the a road map for stopping HIV around the world. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Clinton Reveals Blueprint For An 'AIDS-Free Generation'
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Young activists distribute condoms at an AIDS awareness event in Ashbury Park, N.J. Charles Sykes/AP hide caption

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Is HIV Still A Death Sentence? Young People Weigh In
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HIV treatment regimens, like the pills in this patient's hand, keep AIDS at bay, but can take a harsh physical toll over the course of many years. Amy Sancetta/AP hide caption

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Treatment Gives HIV's Long-Term Survivors Hope, But Takes A Toll
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