Frauke Petry, co-chair of Germany's Alternative for Germany party, and Marine Le Pen, who heads France's far-right National Front attended a conference of European right-wing parties in Koblenz, Germany. France, the Netherlands and Germany all face national elections this year and in each case right-wing populists are in a strong position. Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images hide caption

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European Far-Right Politicians Talk Strategy For Upcoming Elections

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Fair workers at a vegetarian stand sell meatless items at the "Bio" (organic food) section of the International Green Week Food and Agriculture Fair in Berlin in 2011. Germany's minister of agriculture has called for a ban on using meaty words like "schnitzel" and "würst" to market such products. John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A police officer stands guard Wednesday near a Christmas market in Berlin where a truck plowed into a crowd Monday, killing 12 people. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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A Christmas market in central Berlin is seen on Tuesday, a day after a truck smashed into the market, killing 12 people and injuring dozens more. Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jurgen Todenhoefer in 2014 ullstein bild/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Targeted To Teens, A German Play About ISIS Stokes Fear, Teaching Opportunities

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives at a news conference where she announced her plan to run for a fourth term next year. Merkel is the leader of the conservative German Christian Democrats party. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks on Nov. 9 in Berlin, saying that Germany is prepared to work with a Trump administration that respects "democracy, freedom" and human "dignity." Cuneyt Karadag/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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French far-right leader Marine Le Pen arrives to make a statement on Donald Trump's election as president in Nanterre, outside Paris, on Wednesday. She is considered one of the leading candidates in France's 2017 presidential elections. Christophe Ena/AP hide caption

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Christophe Ena/AP

Trump's Election Gives Hope To Europe's Far Right

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The apartment (upper right) in a communist-era housing block in Leipzig, a city in eastern Germany is the location where a Syrian man, suspected of plotting a jihadist bomb attack, was arrested on Monday. After a nationwide manhunt, the man was caught by fellow Syrian refugees. The case has sparked fresh calls for greater checks on asylum seekers. John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Ley (center), head of the German Labor Front, visits Ruegen in 1936. ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Along Germany's Coast, A Nazi Resort Becomes An Upscale Destination

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Berlin has become a vegan mecca, with ice cream shops like Kontor Eismanufaktur Berlin (pictured here), restaurants and even butchers catering to a plant-based diet. Now Germany's nutritionists warn that a vegan diet can't provide all a body needs. Courtesy of Susan Stone hide caption

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Courtesy of Susan Stone

Can A Vegan Diet Give You All You Need? German Nutritionists Say 'Nein'

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Job consultant Saskia Ben jemaa sits in a welcome center for immigrants on Aug. 18 in Berlin. The center assists immigrants and refugees with asylum status in finding jobs, housing and qualification recognition of their previous employment and education. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Firas Awad (left) and wife Tamam Aldrawsha, from Syria, spend hours studying German every day. Awad wants to complete the pharmacy studies he abandoned because of the Syrian war, and Aldrawsha wants to become a nurse. "I want to be useful," she says. "Useful for my family and useful for this country." Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

In A Tiny German Town, Residents And Refugees Adapt

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People mourn near a shopping center in Munich on July 23, the day after a shooting spree there left nine victims dead. The attack was one of several that month in Germany. Johannes Simon/Getty Images hide caption

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