A German police investigator carries a box after searching an apartment believed to belong to the crashed Germanwings flight 4U 9524 co-pilot Andreas Lubitz in Duesseldorf, on Thursday. Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters/Landov

Students mourn in front of their school in Haltern, Germany, on Wednesday, a day after the Germanwings plane crash. Sixteen high-schoolers and two teachers from the school were among the 150 people onboard the plane. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Martin Meissner/AP

Lamya Kaddor teaches Islamic studies in Germany. She's written a new book, Zum Toeten Bereit (Ready To Kill), about the experience of having five former students flee to Syria to join jihadist groups. Andre Zelck/Courtesy of Piper Verlag GmbH hide caption

itoggle caption Andre Zelck/Courtesy of Piper Verlag GmbH

Berlin residents Mareike Geiling (left) and her boyfriend, Jonas Kakoschke, speak with their roommate, a Muslim refugee from Mali. Geiling and Kokoschke helped launch a website that matches Germans willing to share their homes with new arrivals. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

Young fans of the German national soccer team drink iced tea in July 2010 as they watch the FIFA World Cup semi-final match Germany vs. Spain in an Arabic cafe in Berlin's Neukölln district. The neighborhood has gentrified rapidly in recent years, but many of the white families moving in leave once their children reach school age. Local groups are trying to change that. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Earlier this month, Dr. Sadiqu al-Mousllie, accompanied by his family and a few members of their mosque, stood in downtown Braunschweig, Germany, and held up signs that read: "I am a Moslem. What would you like to know?" in an effort to promote dialogue between Muslims and non-Muslims. Courtesy of Sarah Mousllie hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Sarah Mousllie

German police officers gather in preparation for a demonstration by members of LEGIDA, the Leipzig arm of the anti-immigrant movement PEGIDA. Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters/Landov

A new BMW X4 vehicle is unveiled during a March 2014 news conference at the BMW manufacturing plant in Greer, S.C. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Chuck Burton/AP

The warden's barracks at a satellite camp of the Buchenwald concentration camp in Schwerte, Germany, on Jan. 13. According to media reports, the city has proposed housing around 20 refugees in buildings at the camp. The move has drawn protests in Germany. Bernd Thissen/DPA/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Bernd Thissen/DPA/Landov

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, front third from left, attends a vigil in Berlin organized by a German Muslim group to commemorate the victims of last week's attacks in Paris. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Michael Sohn/AP

A protester in Dresden, Germany, holds a poster Monday showing Chancellor Angela Merkel wearing a headscarf during a rally organized by PEGIDA, a group that is against what it calls the "Islamization of Europe." Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jens Meyer/AP

Ali Akdeniz, 85, who always dresses to impress, in some of his various outfits in Berlin. Thanks to photographer Zoe Spawton, he became the star of a blog called What Ali Wore. Courtesy of Zoe Spawton hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Zoe Spawton

Alfons R. of Hamburg, Germany (shown in this undated photo), converted to Islam at age 17. Later, he went to Turkey, then Syria, to join ISIS. He was killed this past summer. Courtesy of Manfred Karg hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Manfred Karg

German Chancellor Angela Merkel uses a mobile phone during a meeting of the German federal parliament in Berlin, on Nov. 28, 2013. The country's labor minister supports a call that would prohibit employers from sending emails to employees after normal business hours. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Michael Sohn/AP

What do you get when three Israelis, two Iranians and a German walk into a room? A Berlin-based world music ensemble known as Sistanagila, named after an Iranian province — Sistan and Baluchestan — and the popular Jewish folk song "Hava Nagila." Courtesy of Sistanagila hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Sistanagila