Truck driver Michael Harry K. is brought into a courtroom in the regional court in Wuerzburg, Germany, on Monday. His face is blurred in accordance with German laws. Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/DPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Stefan Daniel is a 51-year-old German clinical psychologist with multiple sclerosis. He has decided that he will end his life, by taking a barbiturate while sitting in his own living room, when he can no longer see or speak. Esme Nicholson for NPR hide caption

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When And How To Die: Germany Debates Whose Choice It Is

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German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier at a news conference at the Foreign Ministry in Berlin on Friday. Steinmeier will meet Secretary of State John Kerry this weekend to discuss allegations of U.S. spying. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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A fan screams as she watches Brazil lose to Germany, in a live telecast Tuesday in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The host nation is reeling from its loss in the World Cup semifinal. Bruno Magalhaes/AP hide caption

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Brazil Reels From Thrashing That Bounced It From World Cup

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A statue of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin outside an apartment complex in Schwerin, Germany. Erected in 1985, four years before communism collapsed in East Germany, it's believed to be the last Lenin statue in Germany and the town is divided over whether it should stay. The inscription reads, "Decree on land," referring to a Lenin manifesto that said workers were the real owners of the land. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Germany's Battle Over What May Be Its Last Lenin Statue

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Rescuers near the entrance to the Riesending cave at Untersberg mountain near Marktschellenberg, Germany, on Thursday. A seriously injured cave researcher was hauled out after spending two weeks underground. Nicolas Arner/DPA/Landov hide caption

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