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Alexander Gauland, 76, and Alice Weidel, 38, are the leaders of the populist, anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany party. They will both take seats in the country's Parliament later this month. John Macdougall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Macdougall/AFP/Getty Images

The far-right Alternative for Germany party came in third place nationally, but in the eastern state of Saxony, where the town of Pirna is located, the party finished first with 27 percent of the vote. Jens Schlueter/Getty Images hide caption

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Jens Schlueter/Getty Images

Aktham Abulhusn rides the subway on his way to Berlin Alexanderplatz. He came from Syria to Germany in early 2015 on a student visa and now lives there on a refugee visa. Now that his German language skills are improving, he is trying to find a girlfriend. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

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Jacobia Dahm for NPR

Berlin's Tegel is a small and far from modern airport. But many city residents value its convenience and its history and don't want it to close. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Michael Sohn/AP

A poster in Essen showing women in traditional German dress promotes the far-right party Alternative for Germany. The poster says, "Colorful variety? We have already." Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP

Alice Weidel and Alexander Gauland, leading candidates of the right-wing, populist Alternative for Germany (AfD) political party, stand near an AfD poster that reads: "Crime Through Immigration, The Refugee Wave Leaves Behind Clues!" Sept. 18 in Berlin. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

A blue tent covers a British World War II bomb that was found during construction. Disposal operations are set for Sunday and require what's expected to be Germany's biggest evacuation since the war. Boris Roessler/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Boris Roessler/AFP/Getty Images

German police say they have evidence that former nurse Niels Högel murdered at least 84 people. He was already convicted in 2015 of two other murders. Above, Högel covers his face with a folder next to his lawyer in German regional court in 2014. Ingo Wagner/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ingo Wagner/AFP/Getty Images

The past few weeks have revitalized debates across the country about what role Confederate monuments play in commemorating U.S. history. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

What Our Monuments (Don't) Teach Us About Remembering The Past

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This photograph provided by Osnabrück police shows one of the ecstasy pills they seized over Saturday evening. In all, the heap of pills shaped like Donald Trump's head had an estimated street value of nearly $46,000. AP hide caption

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AP

Protesters shout anti-Nazi chants after chasing alt-right blogger Jason Kessler from a news conference on Aug. 13 in Charlottesville. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Explaining, Again, The Nazis' True Evil

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Thieves made off with a refrigerated trailer packed with Nutella, Kinder Surprise eggs and other treats in Neustadt, Germany. Allison Hare/Flickr hide caption

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Allison Hare/Flickr