Rebekah Brooks, last Friday in London. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Reeves reporting for the NPR Newscast

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Rupert Murdoch as he left his apartment in London earlier today (July 12, 2011). Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR's David Folkenflik talks with Mary Louise Kelly

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The scandal prompted News International to fold News of the World. Sunday's issue was the 168-year-old newspaper's last. Matthew Lloyd/Getty Images hide caption

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A policeman walks through the security gates at News International's Wapping plant on July 7, 2011 in London, England. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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'News Of The World' Folding; Hacking Scandal Brings It Down

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Renee Montagne speaks with NPR's David Schaper

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