The 2020 election cycle might have already started. The Federal Election Commission shows that 129 people have filed to run for president in the next election. Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR hide caption

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Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

Starbucks Chairman and CEO Howard Schultz says the company plans to hire 10,000 refugees over the next five years, in response to President Trump's executive order on immigration. Schultz says it "effectively [bans] people from several predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States, including refugees fleeing wars." Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Woohoo! Get wild, all ye Starbucks employees. Now crew necks are acceptable work wear! Starbucks hide caption

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Starbucks

Starbucks' New Dress Code: Purple Hair And Fedoras OK, But Hoodies Forbidden

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How much ice is just right, legally? Marco Arment/Flickr hide caption

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Marco Arment/Flickr

Ice Is Nice, But Do I Have To Say Venti To Get A Large Coffee?

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A Starbucks in Santa Monica, Calif. With no other place to go, many of Los Angeles' homeless end up at the chain's outlets — to the consternation of some employees. Denise Taylor/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Denise Taylor/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

How Starbucks Got Tangled Up In LA's Homelessness Crisis

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The goat did not order a latte. But when it escaped from home and entered a nearby Starbucks in the Northern California town of Rohnert Park, it did have a hankering for cardboard. Sgt. Rick Bates/Rohnert Park Department of Public Safety hide caption

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Sgt. Rick Bates/Rohnert Park Department of Public Safety

Larenda Myres holds an iced coffee drink with a "Race Together" sticker on it at a Starbucks store in Seattle. Starbucks baristas will no longer write "Race Together" on customers' cups starting Sunday. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

A tiny selection of the flavor compounds in pumpkin and pumpkin-pie spices is enough to make our brain think, "Ah, pumpkin pie!" when we drink a pumpkin pie latte. Ashley MacKinnon/Flickr hide caption

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Ashley MacKinnon/Flickr

In some parts of the U.S., Starbucks is testing a latte flavored with roasted-stout notes along with its seasonal autumn drinks such as the Pumpkin Spice Latte, seen here at front. Starbucks hide caption

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Starbucks