Europe Europe

The medieval town of Pitigliano is perched atop a massive volcanic rock, looking out over vineyards and olive groves. It was once home to a vibrant Jewish community, treated with civility or cruelty depending on who was in charge of the city; now, the town works to preserve and share the cultural history of Italian Jews. Michela Simoncini/Flickr hide caption

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Michela Simoncini/Flickr

Italy's 'Little Jerusalem' Opens The Doors To Jewish History

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Barcelona football star Lionel Messi (right) leaves a courthouse in Gava, Spain, in September 2013, after a hearing on tax evasion charges. Messi and his father paid $6.5 million to try to settle the case, but his father may still go on trial. Josep Lago/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josep Lago/AFP/Getty Images

Financial Scandals Tarnish Spanish Soccer Glory

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Nineteen-year-old Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip fired the shots that killed the heir to the Austro-Hungarian empire, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and his wife, Sophie, during a visit to Sarajevo on June 28, 1914. Depending on whom you ask, he's either a hero or a terrorist. Historical Archives Sarajevo/AP hide caption

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Historical Archives Sarajevo/AP

The Shifting Legacy Of The Man Who Shot Franz Ferdinand

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The Russian gas giant Gazprom's Adler thermal power plant in Sochi, Russia. Europe gets about one-third of its natural gas from Russia. Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images

Can Europe Wean Itself Off Russian Gas?

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A doctor vaccinates a child against polio at a health clinic in Damascus, Syria, on Nov. 6. To stop the disease from spreading beyond Syria, health officials plan to vaccinate 20 million children in the region. Youssef Badawi/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Youssef Badawi/EPA /LANDOV

Mario Draghi, president of the European Central Bank. Some say he's super. Daniel Reinhardt /DPA/LANDOV hide caption

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Daniel Reinhardt /DPA/LANDOV

Ava Gene's, a Roman-inspired restaurant in Portland, Ore., incorporates colatura, a modern descendant of ancient Roman fish sauce, into several of its dishes. Deena Prichep/NPR hide caption

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Deena Prichep/NPR

Fish Sauce: An Ancient Roman Condiment Rises Again

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A woman holds up a picture of a 5-year-old girl who disappeared in May in Clermont-Ferrand, in central France. As estimated 250,00 kids go missing each year in Europe, according to the European Union. Many are runaways that are later found, though there are also cases involving small children who are abducted. Thierry Zoccolan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Thierry Zoccolan/AFP/Getty Images

Massive government surveillance of Americans' phone and Internet activity is drawing protests from civil liberties groups, but major legal obstacles stand in the way of any full-blown court hearing on the practice. Among them: government claims that national security secrets will be revealed if the cases are allowed to proceed. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP