Europe Europe

A Southwest Airlines pilot and co-pilot preparing for a flight from Dallas last year. In the wake of the Germanwings crash this week, many European airlines are rushing to adopt a two-person cockpit rule similar to the one already in place in the U.S. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, and Asian leaders approved an agreement on the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank in Beijing in Oct., 2014. European countries are beginning to sign up too. Takaki Yajima/AP hide caption

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Takaki Yajima/AP

Ismael Medjdoub grew up in one of Paris' banlieues. He spends up to two hours a day commuting from his home in Tremblay en France to work and to school at the prestigious Sorbonne in Paris. Bilal Qureshi/NPR hide caption

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Bilal Qureshi/NPR

In France, Young Muslims Often Straddle Two Worlds

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Jeroen Dijsselbloem, the head of the Eurogroup (right) sits next to Roberto Gualtieri, the chairman of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, during a meeting Tuesday at the European Parliament in Brussels. The European Union's executive branch said the list of Greek reform measures for final approval of the extended rescue loans is sufficiently comprehensive to be a valid starting point. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

Swedish navy corvette HMS Visby patrols in the Stockholm Archipelago, Sweden, in October. The Swedish military was searching for evidence of suspected undersea activity in its waters amid reports of a Russian submarine intrusion. Marko Saavala/TT News Agency/AP hide caption

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Marko Saavala/TT News Agency/AP

Russian Threats Expose Europe's Military Cutbacks

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The medieval town of Pitigliano is perched atop a massive volcanic rock, looking out over vineyards and olive groves. It was once home to a vibrant Jewish community, treated with civility or cruelty depending on who was in charge of the city; now, the town works to preserve and share the cultural history of Italian Jews. Michela Simoncini/Flickr hide caption

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Michela Simoncini/Flickr

Italy's 'Little Jerusalem' Opens The Doors To Jewish History

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Barcelona football star Lionel Messi (right) leaves a courthouse in Gava, Spain, in September 2013, after a hearing on tax evasion charges. Messi and his father paid $6.5 million to try to settle the case, but his father may still go on trial. Josep Lago/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josep Lago/AFP/Getty Images

Financial Scandals Tarnish Spanish Soccer Glory

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Nineteen-year-old Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip fired the shots that killed the heir to the Austro-Hungarian empire, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and his wife, Sophie, during a visit to Sarajevo on June 28, 1914. Depending on whom you ask, he's either a hero or a terrorist. Historical Archives Sarajevo/AP hide caption

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Historical Archives Sarajevo/AP

The Shifting Legacy Of The Man Who Shot Franz Ferdinand

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