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Cards depicting the 'royal baby' either as a boy or a girl, specially made by a games company as a publicity stunt are pictured, backdropped by members of the media waiting across the St. Mary's Hospital exclusive Lindo Wing in London on July 11, 2013. Lefteris Pitarakis/AP hide caption

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Protesters demonstrate in Berlin on Tuesday on the eve of President Obama's visit to the German capital. Obama is expected to encounter a more skeptical Germany in talks on trade and secret surveillance practices. Odd Andersen /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Spain's King Juan Carlos, his daughter Infanta Cristina and her husband, Inaki Urdangarin, are seen together on May 22, 2006. A corruption scandal involving Urdangarin, as well as the royal family's lifestyle is contributing to the public's diminishing respect for the monarchy. Jasper Juinen/AP hide caption

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With Safaris And Yachts, Spanish King Comes Under Fire
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The Spanish city of Santander is using a network of sensors to help improve services and save money. Incidents reported to Santander's command-and-control center, where the city manages data from sensors and smartphone reports made by citizens, are plotted on a map of the city. Courtesy of the University of Cantabria hide caption

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High-Tech Sensors Help Old Port City Leap Into Smart Future
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People queue to use an ATM outside of a Laiki Bank branch in Larnaca, Cyprus, on Saturday. Many rushed to cooperative banks after learning that the terms of a bailout deal with international lenders includes a one-time levy on bank deposits. Petros Karadjias/AP hide caption

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Andreas Georgiou (left) is the technocrat charged with running the Greek statistics office. Konstantinos Skordas (right) sits on a governing board for the statistics office Chana Joffe-Walt/NPR hide caption

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Episode 400: What Two Pasta Factories Tell Us About The Italian Economy
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Marijuana in Maastricht Ermindo Armino/AP hide caption

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Episode 395: Maastricht, Marijuana And The European Dream
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