In Italy and the U.S., restaurants are pledging to use sales of Amatrice's signature dish, spaghetti all' amatriciana, to raise funds for the devastated Italian town. Keith Beaty/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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A 6.2 magnitude earthquake devastated central Italy, destroying numerous villages, including Accumoli. Rescue teams are searching for survivors and victims. Michele Amoruso/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Residents stand among damaged buildings after a strong earthquake hit Amatrice on Wednesday. Central Italy was struck by a powerful, magnitude 6.2 earthquake in the early morning. Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sylvia Poggioli holds her hard-earned new Italian driver's license. After intense cramming, she aced the exam. The total cost for driving school, exam and license fees came to nearly $700. Courtesy of Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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Letter From Rome: The Hardest Exam Is The Driving Test

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Former CIA operative Sabrina De Sousa, photographed in her then-home in Washington, D.C., in 2013, has lost an appeal to the Portuguese court system and will be extradited to Italy, she says. Barbara L. Salisbury/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

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Two versions of a letter from Christopher Columbus about his discovery of the New World are displayed in Rome. The book on the bottom, produced centuries ago, has just been returned after having been stolen and replaced with a forgery (top). Domenico Stinellis/AP hide caption

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Stolen Letter From Columbus Found In The Library Of Congress And Returned To Italy

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Men carry a coffin during the arrival of migrants and refugees in the port of Messina following a rescue operation at sea by the Italian Coast Guard ship "Diciotti" on March 17 in Sicily. After several quiet weeks, March saw a pickup in the flow of migrants attempting to reach Italy via Libya, a route through which about 330,000 people have made it to Europe since the start of 2014. Giovanni Isolino/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Members of the LGBT community and supporters filled Rome's Piazza Montecitorio on Thursday to celebrate the vote on same-sex civil unions by the Chamber of Deputies. Simona Granati/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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A Chinese police officer poses with Chinese tourists in front of Milan's cathedral on May 3. Chinese police are on patrol with Italian officers to help make Chinese visitors feel safer. Antonio Calanni/AP hide caption

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Chinese Cops In Italy? Joint Patrols Aim To Ease Chinese Tourists' Jitters

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Riace's medieval old town is a warren of winding cobblestone streets atop a hill. Migrants have revitalized the shopping district. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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A Small Town In Italy Embraces Migrants And Is Reborn

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People gathered during a candlelight procession to honor the memory of Giulio Regeni in his hometown of Fiumicello, Italy, on Sunday. Paolo Giovannini/AP hide caption

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As Questions Swirl, Italy Mourns Death Of Italian Student In Cairo

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Supporters of same-sex civil union gathered last Saturday in central Rome. Italy is the only major Western European country that has not legalized same-sex marriage or civil unions. The Senate plans to take up the question of civil unions on Thursday. Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Holdout In Western Europe, Italy Prepares To Decide On Civil Unions

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