An inspector checks a wheel of Reggiano cheese at the Parmigiano-Reggiano storehouse in Bibbiano, Italy. Earthquakes rocked the region, sending the cheese toppling. Marco Vasini/AP hide caption

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Marco Vasini/AP

For The Love Of Cheese, Diners Unite In Italy

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Italian food expert Julia della Croce suggested Benner try a Tuscan sheep's cheese, or pecorino Toscano, for the filling. Courtesy of Celina della Croce hide caption

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Courtesy of Celina della Croce

Unraveling The Mystery Of A Grandmother's Lost Ravioli Recipe

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Chicago University economist Luigi Zingales sees the U.S. taking steps toward Italian-style cronyism. Chris Lake hide caption

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Chris Lake

Episode 385: How Good Governments Go Bad

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel talks with European Central Bank President Mario Draghi (left) and Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti (right) during the summit of European leaders in Brussels. Bertrand Langlois /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bertrand Langlois /AFP/Getty Images

Two police officers in Mirandola try to comfort a woman after today's earthquake in Northern Italy. Pierre Teyssot /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pierre Teyssot /AFP/Getty Images

The cruise ship Costa Concordia leans on its side off the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

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Gregorio Borgia/AP

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports

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Italy's premier-designate, Mario Monti, on Sunday in Rome. Pier Paolo Cito/AP hide caption

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Pier Paolo Cito/AP

Sylvia Poggioli reporting on 'Morning Edition'

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A man checks a stock exchange monitor outside a bank in Milan, Italy. Italy's key borrowing rate spiked Wednesday well above the 7 percent level that eventually forced other eurozone countries to seek bailouts. Antonio Calanni/AP hide caption

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Antonio Calanni/AP