Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., and Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., seen here in 2012, are both facing competitive elections in 2016. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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How To Lose The Senate In 82 Days

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The NBA is relocating the 2017 All-Star Game from Charlotte, N.C., because of a state law that limits civil rights protections for LGBT people. Bruce Yeung/Getty Images hide caption

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California Attorney General Kamala Harris is running for the U.S. Senate, and is expected on Tuesday to advance to the general election against U.S. Rep. Loretta Sanchez — a fellow Democrat. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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A gender neutral sign is posted outside a bathrooms at Oval Park Grill in Durham, North Carolina. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Before North Carolina, There Were Other Contentious 'Bathroom Bill' Fights

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"Some days I wake up and go, 'Am I wasting time, when I could be on chemotherapy or getting a surgery?' " asks Tony Lapinski, a Montana veteran who worries about what is causing his severe back pain. Michael Albans for NPR hide caption

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Despite $10B 'Fix,' Veterans Are Waiting Even Longer To See Doctors

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Supporters of House Bill 2 gather for a rally at the North Carolina State Capitol in Raleigh, N.C., on April 11. A recent poll found that nearly 49 percent of North Carolinians support at least some part of the controversial law. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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North Carolinians Who Support 'Bathroom Law' Say They're Being Drowned Out

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A bathroom sign welcomes both genders at the Cacao Cinnamon coffee shop in Durham, N.C., on May 3. Jonathan Drake/Reuters hide caption

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When A Transgender Person Uses A Public Bathroom, Who Is At Risk?

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In an interview with NPR's Robert Seigel, North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory defended the controversial HB2 law. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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N.C. Gov. McCrory Claims 'Political Left' Fed Emergence Of Transgender Issues

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Time is running out for a conservative to launch a national third-party presidential campaign, as Ross Perot did in 1992. Doug Mills/AP hide caption

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Is It Too Late For A Third-Party Presidential Candidate To Run?

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Hundreds attend a rally in Chapel Hill, N.C., on March 29 to protest the passage of House Bill 2. The state of North Carolina and the U.S. Justice Department are suing each other over the law's restriction on protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. Chris Seward/Raleigh News & Observer/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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N.C.'s 'Bathroom Law' Energizes Voters On Both Sides Of The Issue

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Demonstrators against House Bill 2 protest outside the Governor's Mansion in downtown Raleigh, N.C., on March 24. Among other restrictions, the law says transgender people have to use the bathroom that corresponds with their biological sex rather than their gender identity. Jill Knight/Raleigh News & Observer/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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