North Carolina North Carolina

Brewers in North Carolina are planning to donate all of the profits from a new beer to two groups that work on behalf of the LGBT community. Raleigh News & Observer/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Raleigh News & Observer/TNS via Getty Images

Citing feedback over HB2, Gov. Pat McCrory said that he has seen "misinformation, misinterpretation, confusion, a lot of passion and frankly, selective outrage and hypocrisy." Screen shot by NPR hide caption

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Screen shot by NPR

"To my mind, it's an attempt by people who cannot stand the progress our country has made in recognizing the human rights of all of our citizens to overturn that progress," said Bruce Springsteen, canceling a planned April 10 concert in North Carolina. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

On Wednesday, North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory signed into law a bill blocking anti-discrimination rules that would protect gay and transgender people. Above, McCrory speaks during the Wake County Republican convention at the state fairgrounds in Raleigh on March 8. Al Drago/CQ Roll Call hide caption

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Al Drago/CQ Roll Call

Listen: North Carolina Debates Transgender Rights

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Confetti falls on the head of John Kasich, governor of Ohio and a 2016 Republican presidential candidate, after speaking during a campaign event in Berea, Ohio, on Tuesday. Kasich secured his first victory on Mega Tuesday. Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A sign directs voters to a polling place during the Super Tuesday primary voting at a polling place in Arlington, Va. Saul Loeb /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb /AFP/Getty Images

Election Officials Tackle Confusing Voter ID Laws In North Carolina

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Dave Manning (left) and three other veterans who are studying to become physician assistants at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Brian Strickland / News.UNCHealthcare.org hide caption

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Brian Strickland / News.UNCHealthcare.org

Making The Most Of Military Medics' Field Experience

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Demonstrators march through the streets of Winston-Salem, N.C., in July 2015, after the beginning of a federal voting rights trial challenging a 2013 state law. The most controversial part of that law — requiring voters to show photo identification at the polls — goes into effect this week, although its language was softened slightly last summer. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Chuck Burton/AP

New Year, New Laws: States Diverge On Gun Rights, Voting Restrictions

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