The China team enters the stadium during the Opening Ceremony of the 2016 Paralympic Games at Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro. The games feature more than 4,300 athletes from 161 countries. Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images hide caption

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Guide Wesley Williams (left) lines up blind long jumper and sprinter Lex Gillette on the track before making a long jump during practice at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in San Diego. Gillette started losing his sight when he was 8 years old. Bill Wechter for NPR hide caption

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Bill Wechter for NPR

For Blind Long Jumper At Paralympics, Success Depends On Teamwork

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Jennifer Schuble trains at the velodrome in Atlanta this summer before the Paralympics, which begin Sept. 7 in Rio de Janeiro. Esther Ciammachilli/WBHM hide caption

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Esther Ciammachilli/WBHM

A Paralympian Cyclist Gears Up For Rio

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International Paralympic Committee President Sir Philip Craven, speaking at a news conference in Rio on Friday, said there would be cutbacks to next month's Paralympic Games in Brazil. Up to 10 countries may not be able to participate, he said. Matt Hazlett/Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Craven, president of the International Paralympic Committee, speaks during a presentation last year of the Rio 2016 Olympic Handball and Rio 2016 Paralympic Goalball venue in Rio de Janeiro. Buda Mendes/Getty Images hide caption

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Sir Philip Craven, president of the International Paralympic Committee, announces Sunday that the entire Russian Paralympic team will be barred from next month's games in Rio de Janeiro. "The anti-doping system in Russia is broken," he said. Joe Scarnici/Getty Images hide caption

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Russian President Vladimir Putin (front and center in dark suit) meets the country's Paralympic team in Moscow after it returned from the London Paralympic Games in 2012. The International Paralympic Committee plans to announce Sunday whether Russia's para athletes will be allowed to compete in the games next month in Brazil. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Runners compete in the marathon at the 2012 Paralympics in London. The International Paralympic Committee said Friday it is investigating reports of widespread doping among Russia's disabled athletes and is considering banning the entire Russian team from the Paralympics in Brazil in September. Emilio Morenatti/AP hide caption

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Emilio Morenatti/AP

Rio has hosted competitions that include athletes with physical impairments (above: the open water swim at Copacobana beach for the Rei e Rainha do Mar). But there's never been an event on the scale of the Paralympics. Buda Mendes/Getty Images hide caption

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On A Scale Of 1 To 10, Brazil Gets A Zero For Disability Access

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The U.S. hopes to repeat as Paralympic gold medalists in sled hockey Saturday, when the team will play host Russia. Earlier this week, Nikko Landeros of USA was chased by Dmitrii Lisov of Russia during group play at the Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games. Harry Engels/Getty Images hide caption

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Archer Matt Stutzman of the U.S. prepares to shoot in the London Paralympics. Born without arms, Stutzman uses a release trigger strapped to his shoulder to fire. Dennis Grombkowski/Getty Images hide caption

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Armless Archer Matt Stutzman Describes How He Shoots A Bow — And Wins Medals

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Bronze medalist Arnu Fourie of South Africa (from left), gold medalist Jonnie Peacock of Great Britain, silver medalist Richard Browne of the United States and Oscar Pistorius of South Africa cross the line in the Men's 100m - T44 Final at London's Olympic Stadium. Jamie McDonald/Getty Images hide caption

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In a surprise finish, Brazil's Alan Fonteles Cardoso Oliveira (left) races past South Africa's Oscar Pistorius to win a gold medal in the 200-meter race at the 2012 London Paralympic Games. Emilio Morenatti/AP hide caption

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Oscar Pistorius Seeks Redemption In Race To Be The World's Fastest Amputee

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Alex Zanardi celebrates winning the gold medal in the men's individual H4 time trial cycling final at the London 2012 Paralympic Games at Brands Hatch circuit, in Kent, southern England. Zanardi's legs were amputated after a racecar crash in 2001. Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oscar Pistorius of South Africa runs in the men's 200-meter event at the Paralympic World Cup in May. Some observers have suggested Pistorius receives an unfair advantage from his carbon-fiber "blade" legs. Michael Steele/Getty Images hide caption

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Studying Oscar Pistorius: Does The 'Blade Runner' Have An Advantage? [Video]

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Paralympic cyclists are featured in the upcoming documentary Unstoppables. black train films hide caption

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black train films