A family member holds twins Eloisa (left) and Eloa, both 8 months old and born with microcephaly, during a Christmas gathering. The mother of the twins, Raquel, who lives in Brazil, said she contracted Zika during her pregnancy. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Brazilians are prolific meat-eaters, so they are struggling with allegations that health officials accepted bribes to allow subpar meat on the market. Victor Moriyama/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Victor Moriyama/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Porto Alegre, one of Brazil's most important commercial and industrial hubs, has declared itself in "financial calamity." Brazil is in the midst of its longest and deepest recession. Philip Reeves/NPR hide caption

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Philip Reeves/NPR

Former star goalie Bruno Fernandes de Souza, shown in 2012 at his murder trial in Contagem, Brazil, was convicted of ordering his ex-girlfriend's death. He was recently released on a technicality and has been signed by another professional soccer team. Gualter Naves/AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gualter Naves/AFP/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. authorities seized approximately $20 million in cash hidden inside a box spring in apartment in Westborough, Mass., on Jan. 4. U.S. Attorney's Office, District of Massachusetts hide caption

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U.S. Attorney's Office, District of Massachusetts

Brazil plans to identify and relocate gang leaders in the Anisio Jobim Penitentiary Complex in Manaus, where a 17-hour riot left 56 inmates dead. Police in Amazonas state are still searching for dozens of inmates who fled during the violence. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

No one is sure why the northeastern part of Brazil has been hit so hard with microcephaly cases. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

How Dangerous Is Zika For Babies, Really?

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"Samba doesn't accept restraint," says Sao Paulo performer Douglas Germano. "It has to break free or else it dies." Courtesy of Douglas Germano hide caption

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Courtesy of Douglas Germano

Brazilian Federal Judge Sergio Moro (right) is leading his country's corruption probe of state-run oil company Petrobras. Two Brazilian companies have agreed to more than $3.5 billion in fines for violating U.S. bribery laws in their dealings with Petrobras. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

This peat soil in Sumatra, Indonesia, was formerly a forest. Clearing and draining such land releases huge amounts of greenhouse gases. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

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Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

Lucas Siqueira identified himself as mixed race on his application for a job at Brazil's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The government decided he wasn't, and his case is still on hold. As part of the affirmative action program in Brazil, state governments have now set up boards to racially classify job applicants. Courtesy of Lucas Siqueira hide caption

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Courtesy of Lucas Siqueira

For Affirmative Action, Brazil Sets Up Controversial Boards To Determine Race

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