Lucas Siqueira identified himself as mixed race on his application for a job at Brazil's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The government decided he wasn't, and his case is still on hold. As part of the affirmative action program in Brazil, state governments have now set up boards to racially classify job applicants. Courtesy of Lucas Siqueira hide caption

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Courtesy of Lucas Siqueira

For Affirmative Action, Brazil Sets Up Controversial Boards To Determine Race

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Suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff testifies on the Senate floor during her impeachment trial Monday in Brasilia, Brazil. Ricardo Botelho/Brazil Photo Press/CON/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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Suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff gestures before delivering a speech in her defense at the National Congress in Brasilia on Monday. Evaristo Sa/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Evaristo Sa/AFP/Getty Images

Brazil's suspended president, Dilma Rousseff, smiles during a rally Wednesday in Brasilia, Brazil. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

Beginning Of The End? Impeachment Trial Opens For Brazil's Dilma Rousseff

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Chef Massimo Bottura checks with cooks as they prepare a gourmet soup kitchen dinner at RefettoRio Gastromotiva restaurant in Rio de Janeiro. Joao Velozo for NPR hide caption

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Joao Velozo for NPR

Master Chef Turns Leftovers Into Fine Dining For Brazil's Hungry

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The Christ the Redeemer statue is visible above the Santa Marta favela in Rio de Janeiro. Joao Velozo for NPR hide caption

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Joao Velozo for NPR

In Rio's Favelas, Hoped-For Benefits From Olympics Have Yet To Materialize

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A protester receives medical attention after tear gas was used during a demonstration in Rio de Janeiro on Aug. 5. Joao Velozo for NPR hide caption

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Joao Velozo for NPR

Controversy Grows In Rio Over Political Protests During Olympics

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Gold medalist Rafaela Silva celebrates during the winners ceremony after the women's 57-kg judo competition in Rio de Janeiro on Monday. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

Fireworks light the sky during a rehearsal Wednesday for the opening ceremony of the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Organizers hope the event, which will be held Friday night in Maracana Stadium, will lift the country's spirits after months of problems leading up to the games. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Activists and supporters march on International Women's Day on March 8 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Marchers called for protection from male violence in a country with high rates of murder and assaults of women. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

For Brazil's Women, Laws Are Not Enough To Deter Rampant Violence

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Civil police officers in Rio de Janeiro threaten to go on strike during a June 27 demonstration against the government for arrears in their salary payments. Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images

With 5 Weeks To Go Until The Olympics, How Prepared Is Rio?

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