Maria Victoria Agostinho, 5, walks outside her home in the Vila Autodromo area of Rio. Her family is slated for eviction, along with others in the area, to make way for building projects related to the 2016 Summer Olympics. Lianne Milton for NPR hide caption

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As Brazil Gears Up For Olympics, Some Poor Families Get Moved Out

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Local authorities celebrate a demolition explosion that's part of Rio's Porto Maravilha urbanization project, in Rio de Janeiro, on Nov. 24, 2013. The state- and federal-supported project is part of the city's redevelopment ahead of the 2016 Summer Olympic Games. Pilar Olivares/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Olympics Set To Transform Rio — But For Better Or Worse?

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Viviane Araujo, a Salguiero samba school queen, performs at a rehearsal for Carnival in Rio de Janeiro. Marcello da Cunha Freire, vice president of the popular samba school, was murdered last month in a drive-by shooting. Lianne Milton for NPR hide caption

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Samba School Murder Exposes The Dark Side Of Rio's Carnival

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Brazilian slave laborers stop their work to listen to a Labor Ministry inspector explain their legal rights, on the Bom Jesus farm in the Amazon basin in 2003. Rickey Rogers/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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At the Australian Bat Clinic in Queensland, 15 baby flying foxes (bats) were lined up and ready to be fed Thursday. They were brought there to get out of the extreme heat, which has killed hundreds of thousands of bats. Trish Wimberley/AP hide caption

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Brazilian chef Alex Atala, whose restaurant, D.O.M., is ranked among the top 10 in the world, was named one of the most influential people by Time magazine this year. Cassio Vasconcellos/AP hide caption

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Amazon Locavore: Meet The Man Putting Brazilian Food On The Map

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As demand for organic food in Brazil rises, organic produce is getting more affordable. Paula Moura for NPR hide caption

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Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian. Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras /EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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A military plot has been blamed in the death of Brazil's former President Juscelino Kubitschek, seen here at the White House in 1961 speaking with President John F. Kennedy. For years, Kubitschek's death was blamed on a car accident. William Allen/AP hide caption

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Brazilian fare from the restaurant D.O.M. in Sao Paulo is some of the best in the world — literally. It's currently ranked the sixth best restaurant in the world by San Pellegrino. Rodrigo Paoletti/flickr hide caption

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What's For Dinner? Try Brazilian

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A lady with two slaves, in Bahia, Brazil, 1860. Moreira Salles Institute Archive hide caption

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Photos Reveal Harsh Detail Of Brazil's History With Slavery

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