Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and FIFA President Sepp Blatter talk prior to Thursday's World Cup match between Brazil and Croatia at Arena de Sao Paulo in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Friedemann Vogel/FIFA via Getty Images hide caption

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The World Cup will come to the Arena de Sao Paola, shown here when it was under construction last fall. Brazil is also making a big push to control the local mosquitoes that can spread dengue fever. Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images hide caption

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Ready, Set, Spray! Brazil Battles Dengue Ahead Of The World Cup

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A fully formed coffee berry, left, is shown next to a damaged coffee berry due to drought, at a coffee farm in Santo Antonio do Jardim, Brazil on Feb. 6. Paulo Whitaker/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Double Trouble For Coffee: Drought And Disease Send Prices Up

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Brazilian kids play soccer in a favela, or shantytown, in Rio de Janeiro on Sunday. Brazil is hosting the World Cup next month and its team is considered the favorite. Many of the country's top players learned the game playing in the street or on dirt fields. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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For Brazil's Soccer Stars, Careers Often Begin On Makeshift Fields

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Cattle rancher Sharon Harvat says she's worried about how the Brazilian beef imports will impact her business. Luke Runyon/NPR hide caption

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Ranchers Wary As U.S. Considers Brazilian Beef Imports

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Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff delivers a speech during the opening ceremony of the "NETmundial Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance", on Wednesday in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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An officer from Brazilian Police Special Forces took aim Tuesday during the violent protest that broke out in one of Rio de Janeiro's slums. People there blame police for a young man's death, and say authorities are clamping down too hard in advance of this June's World Cup soccer tournament and the 2016 Summer Olympics, both of which will be held in Brazil. Christophe Simon /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maria Victoria Agostinho, 5, walks outside her home in the Vila Autodromo area of Rio. Her family is slated for eviction, along with others in the area, to make way for building projects related to the 2016 Summer Olympics. Lianne Milton for NPR hide caption

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As Brazil Gears Up For Olympics, Some Poor Families Get Moved Out

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