Brazil fans on Copacabana Beach were subdued during the third-place game against the Netherlands on Saturday. The national team gave them little to cheer about. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Can Brazil Regain Soccer Glory With Beauty Over Brawn?

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A fan screams as she watches Brazil lose to Germany, in a live telecast Tuesday in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The host nation is reeling from its loss in the World Cup semifinal. Bruno Magalhaes/AP hide caption

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Brazil Reels From Thrashing That Bounced It From World Cup

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Two young men play street soccer in the Rio de Janeiro shantytown of Vidigal on May 14. Marcelo Sayao/EPA/Landov hide caption

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In Brazil, Pacification Paves Way For Baby Steps To Democracy

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Acaraje are a regional food in Brazil made from fried balls of mashed-up beans, onions and salt. The balls are sliced in half, slathered with a spicy pepper sauce and cashew paste, and then topped with shrimp. Russell Lewis/NPR hide caption

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Want To Eat Brazilian Food At The World Cup? Please Step Outside

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Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and FIFA President Sepp Blatter talk prior to Thursday's World Cup match between Brazil and Croatia at Arena de Sao Paulo in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Friedemann Vogel/FIFA via Getty Images hide caption

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The World Cup will come to the Arena de Sao Paola, shown here when it was under construction last fall. Brazil is also making a big push to control the local mosquitoes that can spread dengue fever. Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images hide caption

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Ready, Set, Spray! Brazil Battles Dengue Ahead Of The World Cup

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A fully formed coffee berry, left, is shown next to a damaged coffee berry due to drought, at a coffee farm in Santo Antonio do Jardim, Brazil on Feb. 6. Paulo Whitaker/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Double Trouble For Coffee: Drought And Disease Send Prices Up

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