Baltimore Baltimore

#19 Eric Dorsey, 41 y/o 2/5/16 at 8:54am 3900 Penhurst Ave. This image is part of artist Amy Berbert's series Stains on the Sidewalk, where she photographs the space where someone was killed in Baltimore on the one year anniversary of their death. Courtesy of Amy Berbert hide caption

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Courtesy of Amy Berbert

'Stains On The Sidewalk': Photographer Remembers Year Of Murders In Baltimore

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Charles Barkley and executive producer Dan Partland speak during the American Race Press Luncheon in May in New York City. Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images

Catalina Rodriguez-Lima runs a city office whose mission is to attract new immigrants to Baltimore, a strategy for reversing decades of population decline. Adrian Florido hide caption

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Adrian Florido

Samirah Franklin, 19, is lead organizer of the Baltimore Youth Organizing Project. She lives in West Baltimore, near where the violence and looting broke out after Freddie Gray's funeral two years ago. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

2 Years After Unrest, Baltimore's Youth Are 'Still Fighting For The Basics'

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Jose Cedillo, a 41-year-old former restaurant worker from Honduras, struggles to get health care for his diabetes. He often finds himself without a job and homeless on the streets of Baltimore. Doug Kapustin/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Doug Kapustin/Kaiser Health News

When Jerry Greeff (left) wanted to retire, he donated his auto shop to a nonprofit. Vernon Shaw was Greeff's right-hand man and was a big part of the reason Greeff couldn't just let the business go. By donating the business, Greeff made sure Shaw and his other employees could keep their jobs. Mary Rose Madden/WYPR hide caption

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Mary Rose Madden/WYPR

Lots Of People Donate Their Cars, But This Owner Donated His Auto Repair Shop

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Attorney General Loretta Lynch (right), speaks during a joint news conference to announce the Baltimore Police Department's commitment to a sweeping overhaul of its practices under a court-enforceable agreement with the federal government on Thursday. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Baltimore police spokesman T.J. Smith said a school bus rear-ended a car early Tuesday morning, then struck a pillar at a cemetery and veered into oncoming traffic, smashing into a Maryland Transit Administration bus on the driver's side. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

The Justice Department released a report Wednesday morning that was highly critical of the Baltimore Police Department for systematically stopping, searching and arresting the city's black residents, frequently without grounds for doing so. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

People walk by a mural depicting Freddie Gray in Baltimore on June 23, at the intersection where Gray was arrested in 2015. Prosecutors in Baltimore have dropped all remaining charges against police officers related to Gray's death while in police custody. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Baltimore police Officer Caesar Goodson (right) walks past Deputy Donald Rheubottom before entering a courthouse in Baltimore in January. Goodson, one of six Baltimore police officers charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray, goes on trial starting Thursday. Bryan Woolston, Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Woolston, Pool/Getty Images

In this photo provided by the Baltimore Police Department, Officer Edward Nero poses for a mugshot on May 1, 2015, in Baltimore. He was arrested in connection with the death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray, who died after sustaining injuries while in police custody. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Marvin Cheatham, president of the Matthew Henson Neighborhood Association, stands in front of a row of abandoned homes in West Baltimore. He would like to see them torn down and replaced by a food market, a senior center and a health clinic — all of which the neighborhood currently lacks. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

In Baltimore, Hopes Of Turning Abandoned Properties Into Affordable Homes

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Dr. Leana Wen, Baltimore City health commissioner, visits a newly opened Safe Streets center in the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood in West Baltimore. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

Lesson Learned For Baltimore's Health Commissioner: 'I Like A Fight'

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Stacey McHoul said she ran out of psychiatric medicine a few days after leaving jail last year and soon began using heroin again. Courtesy of Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Courtesy of Kaiser Health News

A mural memorializing Freddie Gray is painted on the wall near the place where he was tackled and arrested last year by police at the Gilmor Homes housing project in Baltimore, Md. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A Year After Freddie Gray's Death, Trials Set To Begin (Again)

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Safe Streets outreach coordinator Dante Barksdale says right after a shooting, the injured almost always talk. "Some of them want revenge, right then and there," he says. "Some of them are afraid. They're thinking about their brother or their homeboy. 'Is my man all right? He was with me!' They're real vulnerable. They got questions." Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Baltimore Sees Hospitals As Key To Breaking A Cycle Of Violence

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Hector Moreno checks a basement for lead paint in Baltimore. He is an environmental assessor with Green and Healthy Homes. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

Baltimore Struggles To Protect Children From Lead Paint

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