Marvin Cheatham, president of the Matthew Henson Neighborhood Association, stands in front of a row of abandoned homes in West Baltimore. He would like to see them torn down and replaced by a food market, a senior center and a health clinic — all of which the neighborhood currently lacks. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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In Baltimore, Hopes Of Turning Abandoned Properties Into Affordable Homes
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Dr. Leana Wen, Baltimore City health commissioner, visits a newly opened Safe Streets center in the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood in West Baltimore. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Lesson Learned For Baltimore's Health Commissioner: 'I Like A Fight'
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Stacey McHoul said she ran out of psychiatric medicine a few days after leaving jail last year and soon began using heroin again. Courtesy of Kaiser Health News hide caption

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A mural memorializing Freddie Gray is painted on the wall near the place where he was tackled and arrested last year by police at the Gilmor Homes housing project in Baltimore, Md. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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A Year After Freddie Gray's Death, Trials Set To Begin (Again)
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Safe Streets outreach coordinator Dante Barksdale says right after a shooting, the injured almost always talk. "Some of them want revenge, right then and there," he says. "Some of them are afraid. They're thinking about their brother or their homeboy. 'Is my man all right? He was with me!' They're real vulnerable. They got questions." Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Baltimore Sees Hospitals As Key To Breaking A Cycle Of Violence
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Hector Moreno checks a basement for lead paint in Baltimore. He is an environmental assessor with Green and Healthy Homes. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Baltimore Struggles To Protect Children From Lead Paint
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Third-graders Ezekiel White (right) and Emanuel Black push a jug of water to the cafeteria at Southwest Baltimore Charter School. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Before Flint, Lead-Contaminated Water Plagued Schools Across U.S.
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Can Baltimore Provide Addiction Treatment On Demand?
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A recurring bone infection landed Robert Peace in the hospital five times after a 2004 car accident fractured a hip. He blames his readmissions on a lack of follow-up care. Doug Kapustin for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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A memorial is seen on a West Baltimore street at the site of the city's 300th homicide on Nov. 19. Jun Tsuboike/NPR hide caption

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In A Sea Of Homicide Stats, A Familiar Name — And A Heartbreaking Story
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Protesters march through the streets after a mistrial was declared in the trial of Baltimore police Officer William G. Porter on Wednesday. Rob Carr/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominique Hall, 22, A Protester In Baltimore
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