Baltimore Baltimore

Baltimore city workers remove graffiti from the pedestal where a statue dedicated to Robert E. Lee and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson stood on Wednesday. The City of Baltimore removed four statues celebrating confederate heroes from city parks overnight, following the weekend's violence in Charlottesville, Va. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Andrea Towson used heroin for more than three decades. After a near-death experience with fentanyl, she sought help. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

'That Fentanyl — That's Death': A Story Of Recovery In Baltimore

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#19 Eric Dorsey, 41 y/o 2/5/16 at 8:54am 3900 Penhurst Ave. This image is part of artist Amy Berbert's series Stains on the Sidewalk, where she photographs the space where someone was killed in Baltimore on the one year anniversary of their death. Courtesy of Amy Berbert hide caption

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Courtesy of Amy Berbert

'Stains On The Sidewalk': Photographer Remembers Year Of Murders In Baltimore

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Charles Barkley and executive producer Dan Partland speak during the American Race Press Luncheon in May in New York City. Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images

Catalina Rodriguez-Lima runs a city office whose mission is to attract new immigrants to Baltimore, a strategy for reversing decades of population decline. Adrian Florido hide caption

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Adrian Florido

Samirah Franklin, 19, is lead organizer of the Baltimore Youth Organizing Project. She lives in West Baltimore, near where the violence and looting broke out after Freddie Gray's funeral two years ago. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

2 Years After Unrest, Baltimore's Youth Are 'Still Fighting For The Basics'

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Jose Cedillo, a 41-year-old former restaurant worker from Honduras, struggles to get health care for his diabetes. He often finds himself without a job and homeless on the streets of Baltimore. Doug Kapustin/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Doug Kapustin/Kaiser Health News

When Jerry Greeff (left) wanted to retire, he donated his auto shop to a nonprofit. Vernon Shaw was Greeff's right-hand man and was a big part of the reason Greeff couldn't just let the business go. By donating the business, Greeff made sure Shaw and his other employees could keep their jobs. Mary Rose Madden/WYPR hide caption

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Mary Rose Madden/WYPR

Lots Of People Donate Their Cars, But This Owner Donated His Auto Repair Shop

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Attorney General Loretta Lynch (right), speaks during a joint news conference to announce the Baltimore Police Department's commitment to a sweeping overhaul of its practices under a court-enforceable agreement with the federal government on Thursday. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Baltimore police spokesman T.J. Smith said a school bus rear-ended a car early Tuesday morning, then struck a pillar at a cemetery and veered into oncoming traffic, smashing into a Maryland Transit Administration bus on the driver's side. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

The Justice Department released a report Wednesday morning that was highly critical of the Baltimore Police Department for systematically stopping, searching and arresting the city's black residents, frequently without grounds for doing so. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

People walk by a mural depicting Freddie Gray in Baltimore on June 23, at the intersection where Gray was arrested in 2015. Prosecutors in Baltimore have dropped all remaining charges against police officers related to Gray's death while in police custody. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Baltimore police Officer Caesar Goodson (right) walks past Deputy Donald Rheubottom before entering a courthouse in Baltimore in January. Goodson, one of six Baltimore police officers charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray, goes on trial starting Thursday. Bryan Woolston, Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Woolston, Pool/Getty Images