"The Block is like living," outreach worker Nathan Fields says. "These relationships, you've got to keep them flourishing." Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Pitching Health Care In Baltimore's Red Light District

Nathan Fields, a health outreach worker, has a knack for building trust with some of the people who distrust public officials the most.

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Mentor Antwon Cooper (left) helps student Julius Barne, 15, during a group activity in a history class. Jun Tsuboike/NPR hide caption

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Dr. Leana Wen, Baltimore's health commissioner, is eager to see hospitals in the city pitch in on public health. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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D. Watkins' work has appeared in The Baltimore Sun and Salon. He will start teaching English at Goucher College in the spring. Aaron Maybin/Hot Books hide caption

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Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake stands outside vacant homes before a ceremony to kick off their restoration in Baltimore in July. In the wake of the riots triggered by the death of Freddie Gray, Rawlings-Blake announced Friday she will not seek re-election. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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A nasal spray version of the overdose-reversing drug naloxone demonstrated at police headquarters in Quincy, Mass., in 2014. Gretchen Ertl/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Health worker Nathan Fields (left), Rep. Donna Edwards and Dr. Leana Wen show people how to use naloxone on a street corner in Sandtown, a Baltimore neighborhood where drug activity is common. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Taylor Alexander, who owns Baltimore clothing store Flawless Damsels, celebrates its recent reopening. A no-interest loan and online fundraiser helped her reopen the shop after it was looted in April's riots following the death of Freddie Gray. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Workers for the Safe Streets violence interruption project including Gardnel Carter, center, talk with Baltimore residents in 2010. Kenneth K. Lam/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

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Leana Wen hands out awards to business owners for their efforts to support breastfeeding at the Baltimore City Health Department on Tuesday. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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