Texas Gov. Greg Abbott at Dallas' City Hall in July. Abbott has strongly endorsed new rules that would require removed fetal tissue to be buried or cremated. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Funeral Directors Weigh In On Texas Rule Requiring Burial Of Fetal Remains

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When Georgia Moore (second from left) was diagnosed with leukemia in 2010, her parents, Trevor and Courtney Moore, worried about the germs her younger sister, Ivy, would bring home from school. Courtesy of the Moore family/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Courtesy of the Moore family/Kaiser Health News

Intensive home-visits by physical, occupational and speech therapists have been "a lifesaver," for little Haylee Crouse, her mom Amanda (left) told Shots. Haylee, who is now 2, developed seizures and physical and intellectual disabilities after contracting meningitis when she was 8 days old. Wade Goodwyn/NPR hide caption

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Wade Goodwyn/NPR

Cuts In Texas Medicaid Hit Rural Kids With Disabilities Especially Hard

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Texas May Be Denying Tens Of Thousands Of Children Special Education

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Local journalist Erik McCowan, standing in the Gonzales Memorial Museum, thinks people should know the history behind the phrase, "Come and take it!" John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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For Sale: A Texan Symbol Of Defiance

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Syrian refugee Maryam al-Jaddou sits with her children Maria (left) and Hasan in their apartment in Dallas. Jaddou says she decided to leave Syria in 2012 after her family's home in Homs was bombed and there was nowhere safe left to live. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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Critics voice concern over this proposed Mexican-American heritage textbook. Some scholars on in the subject say that the textbook, "Mexican American Heritage," is riddled with factual errors, is missing content and promotes racism and culturally offensive stereotypes. Courtesy of Momentum Instruction hide caption

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Courtesy of Momentum Instruction

Keith Cole is one of the Texas inmates in the federal lawsuit challenging extreme heat in Texas prisons. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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Texas Prisoners Sue Over 'Cruel' Conditions, Citing Extreme Heat

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Farmworkers on strike block traffic on the Roma bridge in Roma, Texas, in 1966. Courtesy of AFL-CIO hide caption

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Courtesy of AFL-CIO

Texas Farmworker: 1966 Strike 'Was Like Heading Into War'

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Jesse Murillo (top right) and Megan Newman (bottom) opened the Out West RV park, nestled between Midland and Odessa, as a long-term investment. Since opening the park, the couple have been living in an RV as they build their own home. Ilana Panich-Linsman for NPR hide caption

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Ilana Panich-Linsman for NPR

Texas Town's Fortunes Rise And Fall With Pump Jacks And Oil Prices

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Proponents of a law allowing concealed-carry handguns at Texas state universities say it could prevent incidents similar to the Aug. 1, 1966, University of Texas shootings which left 14 dead. The law went into effect 50 years to the day of the massacre. AP hide caption

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Voters stand in line to cast their ballots inside Calvary Baptist Church in Rosenberg, Texas, on March 1, during the primaries. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

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Abortion rights activists celebrate outside the U.S. Supreme Court Monday for a ruling in a case over a Texas law that places restrictions on abortion clinics. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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