Texas Texas

Dutch Foreign Minister Bert Koenders (center) speaks with Luxembourg Foreign Minister Jean Asselborn (second from left) and British Foreign Minister Philip Hammond (right) during a round table meeting of EU foreign ministers in Luxembourg on Monday. The ministers hope to raise 1 billion euros to fight Ebola. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Virginia Mayo/AP

A man walks past the former site of a clinic that offered abortions in El Paso, Texas. Juan Carlos Llorca/AP hide caption

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Juan Carlos Llorca/AP

Despite Legal Reprieve On Abortion, Some Texas Clinics Remain Closed

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Watch your back, small Texas cafes. Beef brisket (from left), convenience store taquitos and chicken fajitas are taking over Texas. jeffreyw/Flickr; John Burnett/NPR; jefferyw/Flickr hide caption

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jeffreyw/Flickr; John Burnett/NPR; jefferyw/Flickr

A man walks Oct. 3 past the former site of an El Paso, Texas, clinic that offered abortions. It was one of more than a dozen clinics that closed following the implementation of restrictive new building codes. Juan Carlos LLorca/The Associated Press hide caption

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Juan Carlos LLorca/The Associated Press

A plane arrives at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport. Since Ebola screenings began Saturday, none of the 91 passengers identified as having an increased risk of an Ebola infection was found to be sick, the CDC says. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Guillermo Gomez, husband of Vilma Marenco, holds his daughter in their home in Northeast Houston. Marenco was killed in April after being hit by an uninsured trucker who ran a red light. Mayra Beltran/Houston Chronicle hide caption

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Mayra Beltran/Houston Chronicle

In Texas, Traffic Deaths Climb Amid Fracking Boom

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Ballots are stacked and ready as voters wait in line during the 2012 primaries in Milwaukee. An appeals court ruled Monday that a Wisconsin voter ID law, on hold since 2011, could go into effect, but the Supreme Court stepped in on Thursday night to halt the law again as it decides whether to take the case. Jeffrey Phelps/The Associated Press hide caption

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Jeffrey Phelps/The Associated Press

Texas Gov. Rick Perry (left) listens to Tom Geisbert, a professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Texas Medical Branch, explain the work researchers are conducting in a lab in the Galveston National Laboratory on Tuesday. Numerous Republicans, including Perry, have linked the first Ebola case diagnosed in the U.S. to border control and other political issues. Jennifer Reynolds/AP hide caption

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Jennifer Reynolds/AP

In U.S., Ebola Turns From A Public Health Issue To A Political One

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A Red Cross worker delivers bedding to a unit at The Ivy Apartments in Dallas, where a man diagnosed with the Ebola virus had been staying. Mike Stone/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Mike Stone/Reuters/Landov

A Simple Question Can Stop Ebola: How Do You Feel?

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A man diagnosed with the Ebola virus this week is being treated at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. The patient recently traveled to Dallas from Liberia. Mike Stone/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Stone/Getty Images

Traffic moves past Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, where a patient showed up with symptoms that were later confirmed to be Ebola. Mike Stone/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Stone/Getty Images

On The Alert For Ebola, Texas Hospital Still Missed First Case

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A patient at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas has a confirmed case of Ebola, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. He is being treated and kept in strict isolation. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

President Johnson and Mexican President Gustavo DiĀ­az Ordaz, with their wives, celebrate the dedication of the Chamizal Monument in Juarez, Mexico, on Oct. 28, 1967. The monument signified the international boundary marker between the two countries, designated in 1964. Yoichi Okam/Courtesy of the LBJ Presidential Library hide caption

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Yoichi Okam/Courtesy of the LBJ Presidential Library

50 Years Ago, A Fluid Border Made The U.S. 1 Square Mile Smaller

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Low water levels, like at this reservoir near Gustine, Calif., bring birds and mosquitoes together and help transmit West Nile virus to humans. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP