Farmworkers on strike block traffic on the Roma bridge in Roma, Texas, in 1966. Courtesy of AFL-CIO hide caption

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Texas Farmworker: 1966 Strike 'Was Like Heading Into War'

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Jesse Murillo (top right) and Megan Newman (bottom) opened the Out West RV park, nestled between Midland and Odessa, as a long-term investment. Since opening the park, the couple have been living in an RV as they build their own home. Ilana Panich-Linsman for NPR hide caption

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Texas Town's Fortunes Rise And Fall With Pump Jacks And Oil Prices

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Proponents of a law allowing concealed-carry handguns at Texas state universities say it could prevent incidents similar to the Aug. 1, 1966, University of Texas shootings which left 14 dead. The law went into effect 50 years to the day of the massacre. AP hide caption

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Voters stand in line to cast their ballots inside Calvary Baptist Church in Rosenberg, Texas, on March 1, during the primaries. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

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Abortion rights activists celebrate outside the U.S. Supreme Court Monday for a ruling in a case over a Texas law that places restrictions on abortion clinics. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Attorney Bert Rein speaks to the media while standing with plaintiff Abigail Noel Fisher after the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in her case in 2012 in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Medical residents training to be OB-GYNs in Texas don't have many places where they can learn how to perform abortions. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Can Doctors Learn To Perform Abortions Without Doing One?

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Dr. Bernard Rosenfeld, 74, has not been able to find a successor to lead his abortion practice in Houston. He says younger doctors don't want to deal with the politics and protesters. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Politics Makes Abortion Training In Texas Difficult

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Luis Alberto de la Rosa says he sells lots of misoprostol, a drug used in abortions and in ulcer treatment, to women from Texas who come to his Miramar Pharmacy in Nuevo Progreso, Mexico. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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Legal Medical Abortions Are Up In Texas, But So Are DIY Pills From Mexico

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A building on Fort Hood Army Base in Fort Hood, Texas, is seen in this 2014 photo. Rescue crews were searching for four soldiers missing after a training accident on Thursday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Alejandra Ventura lifts her dog out of the water after the Brazos River topped its banks and flooded a mobile home park in Richmond, Texas, on Tuesday. Daniel Kramer/Reuters hide caption

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Inundated With Rain, Texas Residents Brace For More This Week

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A new sticker designates a gender neutral bathroom at a high school in Seattle. President Obama's directive ordering schools to accommodate transgender students has been controversial in some places, leading 11 states to file a lawsuit against the Obama administration in response. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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