Iris Galvez, a health insurance navigator (right) helps Mary Soliz of Houston, Texas, sign up for her first health plan through the Affordable Care Act on January 28, 2015 at a Houston community center. Courtesy of Iris Galvez hide caption

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Two women compare handgun holsters during an open-carry rally at the Texas State Capitol in Austin on Jan. 1. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

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Open-carry supporters attend a rally earlier this month in Austin, Texas. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

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Big Tex at the State Fair of Texas in Dallas. Patricia Marroquin/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Demonstrators march through the streets of Winston-Salem, N.C., in July 2015, after the beginning of a federal voting rights trial challenging a 2013 state law. The most controversial part of that law — requiring voters to show photo identification at the polls — goes into effect this week, although its language was softened slightly last summer. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Activists held an open carry rally at the Texas state capitol on Jan. 1, 2016 in Austin, Texas. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

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Around the Nation

Texas Businesses Adapt To Open-Carry Law

A new law in Texas allows the open carry of handguns. Some business owners, like restaurateur Jack Perkins, are apprehensive.

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The price of oil is displayed in downtown Midland, Texas, in February. Across the state, drilling budgets have been cut and companies have laid off workers. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Nearly 1,000 protesters gather in January across the street from the Curtis Culwell Center in Garland, Texas, where a Muslim conference against hate and terrorism was scheduled to be held. Tony Gutierrez/AP hide caption

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Members of The Syrian People Solidarity Group protest on Nov. 22 in Austin, Texas, after Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced he'd refuse to allow Syrian refugees in the state. Texas and the U.S. government are now clashing in court over the issue. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

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Kalu James moved to Austin, Texas, eight years ago, but bought health insurance for the first time this year. Twenty percent of the city's musicians live below the federal poverty line. Veronica Zaragovia/KUT hide caption

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In San Antonio, a church-based group is helping to raise the minimum wage for city employees. Koocheekoo/Flickr hide caption

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