Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Albert Raby (left) and Ralph Abernathy at City Hall in Chicago, in 1965. Courtesy of Bernard Kleina hide caption

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When King Came To Chicago: See The Rare Images Of His Campaign — In Color

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Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal announces his veto of legislation that major corporations said could legalize discrimination. He said, "I do not think that we have to discriminate against anyone to protect the faith-based community in Georgia." David Goldman/AP hide caption

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Demonstrators of different races and religions from across the country united to take part in the historic march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., 50 years ago. AP hide caption

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'A Proud Walk': 3 Voices On The March From Selma To Montgomery

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Rabbi Max Nussbaum (left) and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Los Angeles. Temple Israel of Hollywood hide caption

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In Hollywood, MLK Delivered A Lesser-Known Speech That Resonates Today

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Civil rights leader Martin Luther King waves to supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Aug. 28, 1963, in Washington. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Why It's Difficult To Find Full Video Of King's Historic Speech

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The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar endorsed a plan Tuesday to remove the disputed "drum major" inscription from the memorial and replace it with a fuller version of the quote. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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