Syrians gather at the site of multiple bombings in the northern coastal city of Jableh, between Latakia and Tartus, on Monday. Scores of people were killed in a spate of bombings in two regime bastions along Syria's coast. A total of seven blasts simultaneously, four in Jableh and three in Tartus, hit the two cities on Monday morning. Stringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Images of dead bodies in Syrian prisons, taken by a Syrian forensic photographer, were displayed at the United Nations last year. They were also put on exhibit at the U.S. Capitol last July. A range of activists and groups are trying to find better ways to document torture and prosecute those responsible. Lucas Jackson/Reuters hide caption

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Documenting Torture: Doctors Search For New Ways To Gather Evidence
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Hezbollah supporters carry the coffin of their slain top commander Mustafa Badreddine during his funeral procession in a southern suburb of Beirut, Lebanon, on Friday. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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A Syrian soldier walks on a ravaged street in Daraya, a besieged suburb of Syria's capital, in February. Xinhua News Agency via Getty hide caption

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Injured Doctors Without Borders staff find shelter in a safe room after an airstrike on their hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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As War Dangers Multiply, Doctors Without Borders Struggles To Adapt
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Leslie Brent, 90, a retired immunology professor who came to Britain as a Jewish child refugee via Kindertransport in 1938, holds his autobiography, showing a photo of himself and other Kindertransport children. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Former Child Refugees, Rescued From Nazis, Urge U.K. To Take Syrian Kids
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U.S. Navy air wing captains pause on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt last September. Every day, the steam-powered catapult aboard this massive ship flings American fighter jets into the sky, on missions to target the extremist Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. Marko Drobnjakovic/AP hide caption

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Moyaad Saad, a 43-year-old former civil servant from Baghdad, feeds his 6-month-old daughter Zahara on their cot in a giant tent at a makeshift migrant camp near the border between Greece and Macedonia. Thousands of asylum seekers are now stuck here after several European countries closed their borders to them. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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As Europe Closes Door To Refugees, Tough Choices For 2 Fathers
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Firefighters combat a blaze on April 29, after regime helicopters targeted a medical center in an opposition-controlled region of Aleppo, Syria. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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A Cease-Fire In Name Alone
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Ahmed Darwish appears in a police station in Rumeilan, northern Syria, after being captured by Kurdish fighters as he was running away from a battle. He was wounded in a coalition airstrike in support of anti-ISIS forces. "There was camaraderie, friendship, like a brotherhood between us," he says of his time in ISIS. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Joining ISIS: It's Not Always For Reasons You Might Assume
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"I never imagined I would be in this position, doing this kind of work," says Raed Al Saleh, 33, of his job as the head of the Syrian Civil Defense. "But these are the circumstances." Courtesy of The Syria Campaign hide caption

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A Wednesday night airstrike at a hospital in Aleppo, Syria, killed more than a dozen people. Beha el Halebi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Hospital Destroyed In Deadly Aleppo Airstrike, Doctors Without Borders Says
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A member of the Kurdish internal security forces (known as the Asayish) inspects the Alaya prison in the northeastern Syrian city of Qamishli on April 22. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Syrian Raed Saleh came to Washington to receive an award for his rescue work in his homeland. However, he was turned back at Dulles International Airport outside Washington. No reason was given. In his honor, those attending the Tuesday evening banquet wore white helmets, a symbol of his group, Syria Civil Defense. Courtesy of Relief International hide caption

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A Syrian Lands In The U.S. For An Award, Only To Be Turned Back
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Syrian President Bashar Assad, flanked by his wife, Asma (left), casts his ballot in the parliamentary elections Wednesday in Damascus, Syria, in a photo released on the official Facebook page of Syrian presidency. AP hide caption

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