Syria Syria

A general view shows the remains of the entrance to the iconic Temple of Bel this week after Syrian government troops recaptured the UNESCO world heritage site from ISIS militants. Maher Al Mounes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maher Al Mounes/AFP/Getty Images

An Assyrian Christian woman prays at a church service in Tell Tamer, Syria. The service is to remember members of the community killed after about 300 people were taken captive by ISIS in March 2015. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

In Syria, Assyrian Christians Cling On After ISIS Onslaught

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Manaf Ibrahim takes a break from making sandwiches in a small town close to an airstrip he believes the U.S. is using to supply its advisers on the ground in eastern Syria. Alice Fordham /NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham /NPR

A Remote Syrian Airstrip Hints At A Growing American Military Role

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U.S.-backed forces recently pushed out the Islamic State in the northeastern Syrian town of Shadadi. They now face the challenge of running the town. So far, few people have been allowed back to amid fears that ISIS infiltrators could return. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

After Pushing ISIS Out Of Town, Can U.S.-Backed Forces Govern It?

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Hozaifa Almaleh (No. 9, on the right of the front row) was a leading member of Syria's national basketball team from 2004 to 2013. He left the country because of war and now plays professionally in Chicago. Courtesy of Hozaifa Almaleh hide caption

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Courtesy of Hozaifa Almaleh

Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) hosts Syrian President Bashar Assad during a meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow. The meeting took place in October, shortly after Russia began a bombing campaign in Syria in support of Assad. Putin abruptly announced Monday that Russia was withdrawing most of its military forces. Alexey Druzhinin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexey Druzhinin/AFP/Getty Images

Russian bombers parked at Hmeimim air base in Syria on March 4. Since the cease-fire began in late February, the warplanes have mostly stayed on the ground. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

A woman navigates a stroller between the rubble of destroyed buildings in the rebel bastion of Douma, Syria, in December 2014. A new report card on the international response to Syria's violence faults the U.N. Security Council. Abd Doumany/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Abd Doumany/AFP/Getty Images

U.S., Russia, Security Council Get A Share Of Blame For Syrian Violence In New Report

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Some 22,000 ISIS recruits are identified by name, telephone and address in a trove of documents that Britain's Sky News says was provided by a disaffected ISIS member. Here, an image of a suicide bomber that was taken from a militant website associated with Islamic State last year. AP hide caption

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AP

As the cease-fire took hold this week, Syrians lost no time returning to the streets to protest the Assad regime. Marchers hold a banner reading "Long live Syria, down with Assad" during an demonstration in the rebel-controlled side of Aleppo on Friday. Karam al-Masri /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karam al-Masri /AFP/Getty Images

Syrians Cautiously Resume Daily Activities As Fragile Cease-Fire Holds

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A wounded Syrian man is carried to a hospital in Kilis, Turkey, just across the border from Syria, last month. The protests against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad began five years ago this month, evolving into a multi-sided civil war. Halit Onur Sandal/AP hide caption

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Halit Onur Sandal/AP

5 Years On, Syria's Moderate Rebels Are Exhausted And Sidelined

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