Syria Syria

Syria's Mohammed Faris was a national hero after he became the country's first cosmonaut in 1987, traveling to the Soviet Union's Mir Space Station. Now he's a refugee in Istanbul, Turkey. Faris, 65, is shown standing in front of a painting of himself as a cosmonaut. A critic of Syria's President Bashar Assad, he still hopes to return to his homeland. Peter Kenyon / NPR hide caption

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Peter Kenyon / NPR

Once A National Hero, Syria's Lone Cosmonaut Is Now A Refugee In Turkey

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Armed men in uniform identified by Syrian Democratic forces as U.S. special operations forces ride in the back of a pickup truck in the village of Fatisah in the northern Syrian province of Raqqa on Wednesday. Delil Souleiman /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman /AFP/Getty Images

People gather their belongings Friday as they leave a refugee camp because of an Islamic State offensive near Azaz, Syria. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Syrians gather at the site of multiple bombings in the northern coastal city of Jableh, between Latakia and Tartus, on Monday. Scores of people were killed in a spate of bombings in two regime bastions along Syria's coast. A total of seven blasts simultaneously, four in Jableh and three in Tartus, hit the two cities on Monday morning. Stringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stringer/AFP/Getty Images

Images of dead bodies in Syrian prisons, taken by a Syrian forensic photographer, were displayed at the United Nations last year. They were also put on exhibit at the U.S. Capitol last July. A range of activists and groups are trying to find better ways to document torture and prosecute those responsible. Lucas Jackson/Reuters hide caption

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Lucas Jackson/Reuters

Documenting Torture: Doctors Search For New Ways To Gather Evidence

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Hezbollah supporters carry the coffin of their slain top commander Mustafa Badreddine during his funeral procession in a southern suburb of Beirut, Lebanon, on Friday. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

A Syrian soldier walks on a ravaged street in Daraya, a besieged suburb of Syria's capital, in February. Xinhua News Agency via Getty hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency via Getty

Injured Doctors Without Borders staff find shelter in a safe room after an airstrike on their hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

As War Dangers Multiply, Doctors Without Borders Struggles To Adapt

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Leslie Brent, 90, a retired immunology professor who came to Britain as a Jewish child refugee via Kindertransport in 1938, holds his autobiography, showing a photo of himself and other Kindertransport children. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

Former Child Refugees, Rescued From Nazis, Urge U.K. To Take Syrian Kids

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U.S. Navy air wing captains pause on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt last September. Every day, the steam-powered catapult aboard this massive ship flings American fighter jets into the sky, on missions to target the extremist Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. Marko Drobnjakovic/AP hide caption

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Marko Drobnjakovic/AP

Moyaad Saad, a 43-year-old former civil servant from Baghdad, feeds his 6-month-old daughter Zahara on their cot in a giant tent at a makeshift migrant camp near the border between Greece and Macedonia. Thousands of asylum seekers are now stuck here after several European countries closed their borders to them. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

As Europe Closes Door To Refugees, Tough Choices For 2 Fathers

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