Syrian pro-government forces stand amidst the rubble in old Aleppo's Jdeideh neighborhood on Friday. George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images

Horror In Aleppo: Civilians Trapped As Syrian Government Tightens Siege

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In central Damascus, it's clear that President Bashar Assad is firmly in control. People close to the regime and government officials say the mood in the city is "better" as regime forces make gains in rebel-held areas. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

As Syrian Government Forces Advance, The War Could Be At A Turning Point

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Syrians who fled from Aleppo's rebel-held areas queue to receive food on Dec. 1 at a shelter in the neighborhood of Jibreen, east of Aleppo. Youssef Karwashan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Youssef Karwashan/AFP/Getty Images

For Aleppo Residents Under Siege, A Risky Journey To Relative Safety

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After six years of conflict and repeated calls by the Obama administration for President Bashar Assad to step down, residents of Damascus, seen here in June 2015, have become more anti-American. Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images

Returning To Damascus, A City Changed By War

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A Syrian woman carries her belongings past Kurdish fighters as she flees on Sunday. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights says shelling has killed 26 people who were trying to flee eastern Aleppo. AP hide caption

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Osama and Ghada sit on the deck of their home in Princeton, N.J. They and their children are refugees from Syria and have been resettled with help from the Nassau Presbyterian Church. Jake Naughton for NPR hide caption

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Jake Naughton for NPR

After Trump's Election, Uncertainty For Syrian Refugees In The U.S.

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President-elect Donald Trump speaks at the Veterans of Foreign Wars convention in Charlotte, N.C., on July 26. Trump has no military experience, but will become commander in chief at a time when the U.S. is bombing targets in four separate wars. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Civil Defense workers and Syrian citizens inspect damaged buildings after airstrikes hit earlier this month in Darat Izza, western Aleppo province, Syria. Airstrikes had halted in eastern Aleppo but have now resumed. AP hide caption

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AP

Egypt's President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi (left) and Russian President Vladimir Putin meet at the Kremlin in Moscow last year. Both leaders have been quick to congratulate U.S. President-elect Donald Trump. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Sculptor Mustafa Ali in the Old City of Damascus, at his office, which used to be a synagogue. (Right) His sculptures, made from bronze, wood, marble and other materials, are popular among collectors in the Middle East and Europe. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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Syria's Leading Sculptor Keeps Creating In A Time Of Destruction

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The Detroit area is the No. 1 destination in the state for Syrian refugees, but a local leader says it's time for that to stop. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Michigan Community Clashes Over Embrace Of Immigrants

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